Newspaper Archive of
The Clarendon Enterprise
Clarendon, Texas
Lyft
April 14, 1994     The Clarendon Enterprise
PAGE 6     (6 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 6     (6 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
April 14, 1994
 

Newspaper Archive of The Clarendon Enterprise produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Page 6 Look Who&apos;s New Nathan and Chrisy Lowrie wo,,ld like to announce the arrival of their son, Mason Dean. Mason was born on March 31,1994 about six weeks ahead of schedule. He weighed 4 pounds 6 ounces and was 18 inches long. Proud grandparents are Gary and Beth English and David and Paula Lowrie. USPS May Force Price Increase for Subscribers AthCCOrding to information from the National Newspaper Association, e United States Postal Service is proposing a big increase in Second Class postage rates. Such an increase would mean that subscrip- tion rates would have to go up on virtually every newspaper and magazine in the country, including The Clarendon News. Five years ago, when The Clarendon News changed ownership, the subscription rates were $14.50 per year in county and the paper took a check for about $40 per week to the Post Office. Now the in-county rates are $16.50, but the cost for mailing is almost $90 per week. The consensus of opinion among editors around the country h virtually unanimous: postal service continues to deteriorate, despite the large rate increases. First Class rates (for letters, etc.) are also expected to increase. The rates for Tldrd Class ("junk mail 's) will not increase nearly as much. Experts predict the hike for weekly newspapers may be as much as a 45 percent increase. The National Newspaper Association, the Texas Press Association and virtually all community papers oppose the rate increase. The Clarenben .tws identified at the Agricultural Sum- mit. They also will increase public awareness of the issues and the process of finding solutions. Each mini-summit will begin at 9 a.m. and continue until 4 p.m. Following brief overviews of the Texas Agricultural Summit process and issues, and the Long Range Extension Planning process for identifying local needs and con- cerns, participants will divide into work groups. Each group will develop strategies for resolving five .... i key issues. These key issues are: :::+i+ :%+i: Protecting the environment and :ii!:<::;!+ natural resources; competitive- ++ .ass of p00blic   policy for agriculture and rural i,:> <i : : y areas; education and information needs of consnmers and develop- MASON DEEN LOWRIE has just ins leadership. come home from the hospital, but After lunch, each mini-sum- even before that, he made mit will again divide into work Grandpa David bust his groups to address specific issues of suspenders! importance to that region. Each work group then will report their ladings and lead discussion on their reports. Following the mini-summits the Summit Leadership Council will develop a plan of action for addressing respective issues and provide it to leaders of all stakeholder groups. Hopes For '94 Cotton Crop Turning To Dust On High Plains By Zachary Wilcox, CEA-Ag Hopes for their 1994 cotton crop are rapidly turning to dust for growers on the Texas High Plains. Following a record '93 crop, cotton farmers in this three-miIGon-acre "cotton patch" are looking all the way back to 1974 to find fields as dry as they are now, that year was a disaster. Only two of the 25 High Plains counties --Floyd and Brisco- - have moderate soil moisture. From last August until now, only 3.4 inches of rain have fallen at Lubbock. Rains have largely jumped over the entire High Plains. Most cotton counties (on the High Plains) have a soil moisture deficit of between six to 10 inches. The soil moisture deficit is the dif- ference between what could be stored and what is stored. Only seven inches of rain fell across the 25-county area from August 1973 until August 1974. Then in August, September and Themini-summitsinMaywill October 1974, when cotton bolls provide oppoRunifies for regional were ma and opening, 16 in- leaders of all the stakeholders t ches of ram felL . discuss solutions for the issues The area yield that year was only 264 pounds of lint an acre and i !i!! iii 00iiii00!i i !i!! i!i: ii! i !iiiii i ! ii i ! ! !!i i !!i!!i iii i ! i i i iS Local post offices do not appear to have any say in postal rates. Comments should be directed to: Postmaster General Marvin Runyon, 475 L'0000nt Pla= Southwest, Wash,-gton, DC 2O26O. AG MEET--f00m 1. Tne00. -- N94378,3"-27 J Bedding Plants In Stock 1 IV 11[ = The regional "mini-sumts" are a followup to the Texas Agricultural Summit held last Oc- tober at the Texas A&M campus in College Station. More than 450 leaders representing a wide diver- sity of interests identified high priority issues that will impact agriculture in the 21st Summit Leadership Council and regional councils of citizens representing the Plains, South, Central, East and West Texas. The Texas Agriculture Sum- mit is a work still in progress, we demonstrated that people from agricultural production and processing, agrib-.iness, govern- ment, the universities, environmen- tal and consumer groups could come together to focus on sig- nificant issues of concern to us alL Now we must translate our inten- tions into action by engaging even more people in dialog about agriculture and in forging new al- liances to address the issues iden- tified through the Summit process. STATEMENT OF CONDITIONS PUBLICATION COPY - COMMERCIAL AND SAVINGS BANKS CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF CONDITION 0nluding Domeetic an Foreign Slldiarfes) STATE(I LEGAL TITLE OF BANK |STATE BANK NO. The Donley CounTy St:ate Bank f 141-15 P.O. Box 967 eeoea,L assaav otBnv .o Clarendon, Texas 79226-0967 |1 3 04349 CiTY ]COUNTY rTATET lP CODE [CLOSE OF BUSINESS DATE Clarendon | Donley exaa |79226-0967 I 1994 ASSETS 1. Cash and balances due from depositO institutions: I. Nontnterest - beadng balarl snd cgrrency and Oi ..... b. IareM - 1cearlng efer.l ................ 1 .b 2 Securities ......... 2. 3 Ferel furs sold & SeCurdmS purchese under sgrNtmnt$ IO resell in dOmnllo offices of the bank & of Its Edge & Agreement subsidiaries, & in IBFs: s. Foderal nds SO ............................ 31. b. Socudtiel pumheled under agreernlntl to mlNdl 3.b. 4 Loans and lease finltncng receivables: a Loans and leaces, net of unearned income 4.1. b. LESS: AIk)wanc$ for ldsn snO I@ill Joala 4.b. C LESS Allocated trlcefer risk reserve 4., d LOSerS &d kaceS, ot St upturned (P004, sK)wafe,  f14H. (em 4.s mW*a 4.b and 4,C) .................. 4.d. 5. Assets hold in trading accounts .............................................................................. 5. 6. Premises slxI fixed assets (including ce/lal+zed 14111411) ........................................................... 6" 7 Other teal estate OWned ............................................................................................ 7. 8 Investments in uonsolted subsidiaries sn associated comInhre .......................... 8+ g. Cuetom0rs' Haitly tO this hank On suTept oldandlng g. 10. Imangible allels ..................................................................................... 10. 11 Other assets 12 a+ Total ISIO (sum O1 items 1 through 1 1) ................................................................ 12.1. b. LOf dolerred 0utlRtant to 12 U.S.C 1823 ) .................................................................... I.b. Total ascetl lf losses dots'O rauant Io 12 US.C, 18230) (sum 01 It,ms 12.s end 12,h) ...................... 12.. LIABILITIES 13. Deposits: a In domsali offices ...... 13.S. (1) Noninlemst - baarlrlg ............................................................ 13+S.(1) (2) Irerosl- hearing ................................................................ 13:ei(2) b. In loteign offices. Edge and Agt'41lml iiutlidtall, and IBFI .......................................... 13.b. (1) Nonintarest - bearing ...................................................... 13.h.(1) (2) Interest- besting ................................................................. 13.b,(2) 14 Fedrat funds pchased and securilk+S sold ulr lugreem.ntl to relP, lhso. Im dOm$ OtSO O| the i ot its Edge i AgTement surs, A in IOFa: a. Federal lunde purchased ............................... 14.a. b. S.ctJdtfee 11ok:l tJnd@r a01'oefels to roO4JtChal. ......... 14.b. I Demand notes isued tO the US. Treasury .......................................................................... 15. 1S, I Other borrowed money ..................................................................... 17 Moflgegs #adsbtednsss and ODitltlOnS under cepltlllZl 14111411 ................................................... t+ Blnk's llabillly On acceptances executed end outstanding ....................................................... 18. 18, t9, S;bordimlted r'tes and debentures ................................................................ 20 Other bitities ............................................................................................... 21. Total labitllll (sum of items 13 throh 20] .................................................................. 22 LimtaO - life preferred Stock itrJ roklted skm ................................................. EQUITY CAPITAL 23. Perpetual ieferred stOCk and related sur4us (No. of shares Otdalandi [ 0 I ) ............ 241Common atOCk (No of shares S Aulhrh[ed ............................ I 4,000 b, Out*tarn ............................ [ 4.000 ) ...... 25. Surpce (exclude all surplus related to preferred stOCk) ............................................................ 2( a. Undiv. lrofits and Clltal reserves ........................................................................... b. LESS: Net unrealized losS on marketab equity S4CuI ........................................ 27. Cumt.lletNs totl curre,'y Stiff, Ill,iOn edjt.atm,tMs .................................................................. 28 S Total luity capital (Sum ot items 23 through 27) .................................................................. b LOllS d.fsrre pureuant to 12 UBIC. 1823 (j) ................. C Total equity ca04tal and losses deferrll pureUlfl Io 12 US.C. 11123 (j) (sum ol items 28.a. & 28.b) 29. Total abiiias, rted - life poferred MOCk, equity cap4al, and Iolsea deferred pUUam tO 12 U+SC 1823  (sum of items 21.22, and 28, I ................................................................... MEMORANDA: Amounts outstanding its of Report of Condhlon dMe: 1 a Standby loflerl Of oredit. Total ........................................................................................................ 1.S. 1+ b,Amoutff Ol Slwldby lerl ot credit in memo 1 ,I.  to OIPIMI Ihtot balfo"l ......................... NOTE: Th r$ mcet he ed b an shoflzed o111 and alfed b not 11  thflt  other 11141t'1 the o41)  @ 0. we, ths undlre|l ot|lCll), o h ireS/dllire that thtS R@p@rt of ndlt  hee bl@n pflwId  eformlnl wl oo llflkl I II tul mld orrel to 1he bsll of m (O:J knowled}e wld balltl, SIGNATt.* O )FEICEP,(''HOPAJZEO TO SION REPORT IDATE BINNED N AE(S) AND TITLE(S) OF OFFiCER(SAUT#(OR' TO SIGN  IAREA CODE/PHONE NO. .obbte Thornberry e Asszstant Vlce-preBldent & Cashleg i 806874-381 We, the undoralgned directors, sliest to the corroTmeM of this R of Conditlo  declare th/tt It ha= been eminl by t  Io the bast of OUr knowle0ge td bal,ef,has been preemd in confomwba with offi(l tnstr;flons  III tru 1 correct. SIGNATURE OF DIRECTOR.,   DJCR"" " I$1GNATURF= ORECTOR "  o ,+m-++.,,nd, +.,+re . ,,,, ..... .. m ....... +., +  +...,,I++ ........... (']+ p[lJ+,l]4tll+lStff] that l am not an oftfoer or ditecto of th+s banl<, .....f- l.+r.....+. J  l,lg.,lt...... quality was poor. Last year, the area's record crop of more than 3.6 million bales averaged 658 pounds an acre for irrigated fields and 503 pounds an acre for dryiand fields, with outstanding strength and micronaire (fineness). That 1993 dryland crop had healthy, deep roots that extracted all of the surface soil and most of the deep soil moisture. The surface hasn't received any moisture for planting, and is powder dry. With only scant rain after July last year, irrigated fields were also dry at harvest. Those fields also had excellent root systems that ex- tracted deep moisture. By the time that crop was complete, wells were declining. Pivot irrigation systems required renozzling several times during the season to keep water flowing to the end of the pivots from the dwindling well capacity. Over last winter, producers pre-irrigated these fields and the wells haven't recovered during the pre-irrigation season for the )4 crop. Row-watered fields that were irrigated early also have lost seed bed moisture. These will need to be rewatered, or wait for rain, prior to planting. Sprinkler-irrigated fields have had heavy evaporation losses in recent weeks. Duly LEPA (low energy precim'on application) pre-irrigated fields have fared reasonably well. Because these limit evaporative losses by placing the water directly on the sol in a small wetted surface area. If rain sets in now, it could provide needed moisture for plant- in but keep farmers out of their fields until May. Mid-April through May is considered the op- tim,,,,, planting time in much of the High Plains. But, only once in the 90 years since precipitation records have been reported has our April rinfall exceeded four inches. A more realistic scenario is that some planting rain will fall in late April or May and dryland producers will scramble to plant as much as possible before the dry winds suck the moisture from the soil Patchy stands wig result, with parts of the field dev()id of plants where the race was lost to the d,,y00 winds. , Where stands do result, any :failure of rin. to shower on the : Plata ia 7- to 14- day iutervals will result in cotton that abruptly runs out of moisture and either dies or smloads fruit. Thursday, April 14, HELL HAS NO EX1TS. Live Drama to be Presented dram00 previously performed in Hollis, and Shamrock, will be presented in Clarendon p.m. at the Community Building. This drama is based on the true life experiences of Baxter. Mrs. Baxter was an ordinary housewife living when she was given a revelation of hell by the Lord Jesus Christ. her into hell and told her to write a book about the things she saw andl Five counties are represented by this area-wide cast. From Clarendon: Gary English plays Johnny, a defiant soul in Hell. From Memphis: Maxy Kathryn Baxter, a reluctant visitor to Hell, is played by I Welch. Vishnu, a woman woman who has too many gods, is Dabble Harris. From Wellington: Barbara Reynolds portrays Ruth, a seasoned missionary. Neeley plays Billy, a young man resigned to an eternity in HelL doting and deh'beratc mother is played by Denise Mithlo. Davy plays Jake, a good neighbor with a word of warning. From Childress: Laura Jenkins plays Sylvia, a young woman in the occult. From Dodson: Eleanor, played by Eva Norman, is at war with God. queen is played by Blossom Rowe. Rachel, a woman who wants to kill her husband. The role of Satan is Raymond Ditmore. Glenn Rowe plays the role of Jesus. From Hollis, Oklahoma: Leshia Mills plays Tina, a spunky young missionary. They invite you to come and see this live drama! For irrigated cotton the scenario of April - May rain is only marginally better than for dryland. Producers should have moisture to plant, but the lack of deep moisture and  well capacities will make this an expensive crop to grow, and one that is higidy vnl- nerable to drought in July or August. Producers will start irrigating shortly after the plants emerge to heap from running behind in July. Even a pivot considered to have a good water supply (four gallons per minute per acre) can only meet half the water needs in July and August, which is eight gallons a minute per acre. The other half comes from stored soil moisture. Irrigated cotton production on the Texas High Plains in 1994 will most likely be a high risk ven- ture, with the crop surviving from hand to mouth with each passing cloud that sustains the crop for another week. For more information you may contact Zachary Wilcox, at the Extension Office at 874-2141. pair of boots. Red Wing Boots. From the brand you trust. James Owens Leather Goods Custom Plowing PhOne: 874-2727 or 874-2598 SLIM SIDES DOUBLE S TV & VCR REPAIR P.O. Box 750 Clarendon, Tx. 79226 Ph. (806) 874-5081 N(YrlC OF RIGHT TO NOMINATE BY PETITION The Fatmel llom Admlnilffltiod (FmHA) II tcceptin$ nomins fat County Committee eloctioKi Pot Dol3.].ey,..Allzoi +CtuBS notice II ilsued to infotm Mlgibl6 votetl of th fight to nominate candid petition. CoNes of the pMItloh and Intructlonl on Itt eompletioh c/tnl obtdned from your loed FmHA offle, Petmns nomhuttM Ihould hive tfl lhtettt  Ii farm I! Ih owner, Ot thateopper wlthl the county 0t let I hlch tetlvltl| of e eounty or eolnmlttee t tttled eel They ul/b l/lz6fil bt th* U ntted Statel or lawful idmRted te th0 UMtM ttts tot pe:ntdfti tetidehce, tnd be qudKled for commRte6 e4t. 9pddM4 61 th61 pMtoht who mtt tKl ll .Iteb me tim elktbl t6t bIM tot ttmti05 to th+ county Nomlnatlonl mud Id feeed M Ld--(:P'.(- f C . nO election, me open to  +1t!6 +0ttl wtthottt tttd tO t1, color, tuitional Odgl.. Me+ poUtktd lt[llttkm, ifltJ'litltl, l, tfid/ot i:!