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2 :ii i!i  i ! ii i '::, i   i .. i The Clarendon Enterprise April 15, 2004 WARNING: The following column is an editorial (i.e. an opinion, a point of view) and may contain ideas with which some readers may freely disagree. t could be harmful to liberals, socialists, and other small mammals. Read at your own risk. Remember the men who died for Texas Next Wednesday will mark the 168th anniversary of the Battle of San Jacinto - the great military upset that stunned the government of Gen. Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna and won Texas its independence from Mexico. Unfortunately, the day will go by like any other as time carries us further away and modem Texans slowly let history slip away. It is important that we keep our history alive to remind us of where we have been and where we are going. This is particularly important because the lessons learned from the period of the Texas Revolution can have a sig- editor's nificant beating on this state and commentary the entire nation today, by roger esdack Illegal immigration was a factor back in the 1820s and 1830s, albeit in a reverse fashion from what we see today as Anglo-Americans crossed the Red River into what was then Mexican territory. Legal immigration was also a problem for Mexico as it tried - unsuccessfully - to force cultural changes on Anglo-American settlers, also known as Texians. Modem proponents of making English the official language of this country might want to think about that. Attempts at forced assimilation and a general dis- regard for the role of law on the part of the Mexican dictator were contributing factors to the revolution. The problem with trying to force the newcomers to speak Spanish, making them convert to Catholicism, or trampling on their rights was, as Professor Camilio Martinez always put it: "You cannot tell an American what to do." At least you couldn't in 1836. Today, I'm not sure that's still the case since many Americans seem to expect government to take care of them like they are little children and are willing to give up their money and certain degrees of freedom to achieve the illusion of security. Texan sensibilities have also changed somewhat with regard to our history. Last fall, this column reported on a movement to have Texas history classes taught about the Goliad "Execution" rather than the more familiar Goliad Massacre so as to be more sensi- tive to Mexican-Americans. My response to that stupid idea was that history classes should teach the important roles played by many Tejanos in the Texas Revolution rather than gloss over the atrocities committed by the military of the Mexican dictator. There are some people out there who would dis- agree with my opinion and who are, I suppose, ashamed of the Texas Revolution. Last week, I had the good fortune to see the new motion picture account of The Alamo, and the movie is very good, although it does take some artistic liberties. The execution of David Crockett is particularly price- less. Santa Anna demands Crockett, who is on his knees and surrounded by the entire Mexican Army, discuss surrender. Crockett, played by Billy Bob Thornton, tells the interpreter that he is willing to discuss surrender and that if the Mexicans will all lay down their arms right now, he'll put in a good word for them with Gen. Hous- ton. Santa Anna doesn't see the humor in that remark and has Crockett shot. All joking aside, the essential truth of the Alamo story still comes through in the film - a small band of men fighting for what they believe in and willing to die for their rights. As the movie shows, the sacrifice of those men fueled the rage of the Texans and the Tejanos and propelled them to swift victory at San Jacinto. Upon leaving the theatre, I passed by a group of four young people - two Anglo men and two Hispan- ics. "Hey, I'm really sorry about all that," one sniveling Anglo said to the Hispanics. "Yeah, me too, dude" the other Anglo said. "I mean... I wasn't there back then and I didn't do it, but I think it was wrong, man" The Hispanics, meanwhile, shuffled from one foot to the other and looked like they couldn't figure out what the beck these two nincompoops were apologiz- ing for. I thought to myself: "This is exactly what's wrong with this country today. These kids are so ignorant about history that they think they have to make amends for Sam Houston's army kicking Santa Anna's fanny." No apology is necessary for the Texas victory at San Jacinto. To even offer one is to disgrace the memo- ries of the men who died on that field, at Goliad, and at the Alamo. The Texas rebels were not perfect men. Some of them had checkered pasts. Some were swindlers, cheats, and drunks. But I think it's safe to say they each wanted a better life than what they had left behind and a better future for their children, and they wanted to live that new life free from oppression. In the movie, Col. William Travis, played by Pat- rick Wilson, addresses that very issue as he tells the men under his command about their hopeless situation. He acknowledges that Texas means different things to all of them and then says: "I'd like to ask each of you what it is you value so highly that you are willing to fight and possibly die for. We will call that Texas." The question posed by Wilson's character was probably lost on the dudes in the theatre lobby, but it is really just as valid today. What do you value so highly? What would you die for? Your family? Your indepen- dence? Do you really remember San Jacinto and the Alamo and the sacrifices made there? Sadly, many people do not. Best friend a casualty of new epidemic I may have neglected to tell you this, but it seems that there is a horrible epi- demic raging across Hardin-Simmons Uni- versity campus. It's very contagious, and it oniy seems to affect women. The first symptom is pure and unadul- was brought along for my opinion, but my opinion was invari- ably ignored. I just had to wear it. I did not have to live with terated insanity followed by a break out of my decision for the diamonds on their left hands. This rash is rest of my life like life's lessens generally isolated to one finger in particu- Whitney obviously by carrie helms 181". It seems to be carded by men and passed on to women, because it doesn't seem to have any affect on single women like myself, except to make us extremely bitter. In one week, I kid you not, we lost fif- teen girls. Half of them were close friends of mine. I lost my best friend Whitney. Whitney is to married in August. And I am a bridesmaid. I'm going to go ahead and just be honest with you; all of my bitterness comes from pure jealousy. I would have given my right arm to be picking out dresses and invitations and looking at Bride magazines with my mother. Please note that sentence is in the past tense. I have changed my mind. Last weekend, Whitney called me up to go pick out fabric. We spent two hours circling around Abilene to find the perfect balance of shiny and textured; pink, but not too pink; brown, but not too brown. Of course, I had no say in the matter. I did. We made our choice, but not before she had harassed a few fabric store employees and asked the opinion of every- one in the store. I spent part of my Easter break with Whitney at her house. I drove down there by myself, praying out loud with despera- tion that Jesus would come back before I got to Midland. My whole purpose in going was to be measured for my bridesmaid's dress. Not only was this to be a reminder that I was not a bride, but also it was a not so gentle hint that I am not quite as thin as I used to be. Self-esteem goes through the roof. The dressmaker had finished part of Whitney's dress; and as I watched Whitney having her first fitting in her dress, I had to stifle a tear or two. Then Morn came in and started dis- cussing underwear, and just how badly Whitney needed a push-up bra. The entire store is now discussing Whitney's chest. She decides she needs a little support (no pun intended), and drags me into the conversation. "Carrie has the same problem I do. Don't you, Carrie?" So now I'm fat, single, and flat chested. Okay. I'll go with that. "Thank you for your concern, old friend, but this is your day. You need to have better cleavage than I do. Don't you worry about me. I'll be fine." My part of the mission was com- pleted in about 15 seconds before we left the dressmaker. It was only 6:00. If I ran, I could be back in Abilene before dark, watching chick flicks and eating ice cream in my dorm room. But that would be rude. I stayed on through dinner and the discussion of the invitations. They had to have the perfect balance of traditional and modem; religious, but not too religious; sweet, but not too sweet. Two hours of looking at every Web site with invitation wording, everyone asking my opinion but no one really caring what it was, and I was ready for bed. They invited me to stay on for the rest of the weekend. Tomorrow we were shop- ping for flowers and shoes and veils! Oh boy ! I politely declined. I had had all the wedding I could take. I let them know, however, that they could certainly call me when they wanted someone to sample the cake. War on Terror overrides other concerns One of the things I enjoy most about being your United States Senator is the opportunity I get to visit with you as I travel around our great state. Every April, during the legislative break in Washington, I like to update Texans on what Congress has done during the first quarter of the year. While I make stops across the state, I wanted to also take a moment and update you in this column. One of our chief accomplishments thus far was the passage of the 2005 Budget, It has passed the Senate and provides a roadmap to win the war on ter- rorism, defend the homeland, promote economic growth, and create new jobs. The budget clearly reflects our top priority of protecting Americans at home and abroad, while moving to cut the federal deficit in half, in just a few years. It is pending in the House of Representatives. We've also made great strides toward improv- ing our nation's economy. Ameri- cans are still reaping the benefits of last capit year's tax relief. We O[ received the good comment news that 308,000 by tn. kay bailey butchison jobs had been cre- ated in March, bringing the seven-month total to 759,000 jobs. To continue that trend of job creation, we are working on the JOBS Act to pre- serve work for thousands of Americans, alleviate the tax burden on manufacturing companies, and allow U.S. businesses to compete fairly with their European coun- terparts. Unfortunately, it has not passed the Senate, but we will continue to work to lower unemployment and make sure every American looking for work can find it. Passage of a comprehensive energy policy remains a burning issue for Con- gress, particularly as we suffer through record gas prices at the pump. I'm hopeful we'll be able to produce a bill that will lower costs, promote conservation, reduce our reliance on foreign sources of oil, and create jobs and opportunities at home. But overriding everything we do in Congress is the war on terror our men and women in uniform are waging everyday. We know we are up against a vicious enemy who values nothing, not even their own lives, as they seek to destroy freedom and democracy. In Washington, we'll continue to give our soldiers the resources, suplx3rt' and encouragement they need to defend our freedom and way of life. DCHD board member responds to letters In response to recent articles in the paper and the rumors around town, I feel I need to set the record straight. We have an excellent nursing home and ambulance authority with outstanding employees. I do not wish to sell or close the nursing home or fire nor cut employees' salaries. When you take the oath of office, you agree to do three things as a director of the hospital district. "The duty of care" requires you to apply the same level of care in managing the affairs of the hospital as a reasonably prudent person would apply in managing his or her business affairs. "The duty of loyalty" means avoiding conflicts, self-dealing, enrichment, and breaches of confidentiality. "The duty of obedience" means obeying the law, including statutes, enabling legislation, and bylaws. Comply- ing with these three general duties won't guarantee that you will never be sued as a director, but it should insure that you will win if a case is ever brought against you. The financial loss of the Medical Center Nursing Home for the last four years is as follows: 2000 - $171,507; 2001 -$199,911; 2002 - $44,767; 2003 - $199,779. These figures include deprecia- tion because there is no cash set aside for replacement of depreciated items, i.e. roof, refrigerators, air conditioners, or carpet. We have also canceled the professional liability insurance, which means no pro- tection from being sued by nursing home residents or families. For the first eight months of this fiscal year, we are operating at 91 percent occupancy, five percent less than expected or $66,000 less revenue than expected. The Donley County Hospital District has a bond of $1,645,000 payable until 2022 of approximately $130,000 a year. Notes payable to Community Bank are approximately $160,000. I believe that the taxpayer is at risk of higher taxes because of having no profes- sional liability insurance and operating at a continuous loss with no cash reserve for nursing home needs or ambulance author- ity needs. My goal for the next year is to hold the tax rate at the current level. I want to work towards getting the nursing home in the best possible financial health while keeping wages strong and working towards providing health insurance to keep quality employees. I want the residents to get the best physical care and be secure and happy in their nursing home environment. Their families need to feel their emotional and physical needs are satisfied. In response to Buddy Howard's letter (March 25, 2004) regarding underpaid employees, the board has never been asked by the administrator for higher wages or less hours. Alan etdl, DCI-I Dtreaar Consider MCNH residents I have been blessed to have the God given opportunity to be a volunteer at MCNH for over three years now. As a concerned citizens and tax payer, I would urge each voter, before election time, to take some of their time to visit the nursing home and talk to the residents and staff to witness the excellent care, love, and compassion that our loved ones receive at MCNH. Let's continue to see that the residents receive the best care and not lessen their quality of life. We are fortunate as a com- munity to have one of the nicest, cleanest, best run nursing homes in the area. Prayerfully consider the residents' needs when you go to vote. Judy Castmer, Lella Lalte 126th Year, Series Any erroneous reflection standing, or reputation a corporation which may ofllw rectel upon being the management.  Publither & Editor Web Master J Distribution J J Howardwick Clarendon Hedley On The Mark J Open Dtolay rates ate Inch. e lv words and 12# per word (Boxes or Thank You Notes are $fll aad 12# per word Engagement, wedding, announcements are $t0 mitred for Ami for zip codes inside of county, and Send all address IImlNtl PO BOX 79226-1110. of that letter. Letters mar, style, or length. All and must include an number for verification your chances space your letter, keep R brief. No ter ' candtdate for local lubmltted to thb 2 :ii i!i  i ! ii i '::, i   i .. i The Clarendon Enterprise April 15, 2004 WARNING: The following column is an editorial (i.e. an opinion, a point of view) and may contain ideas with which some readers may freely disagree. t could be harmful to liberals, socialists, and other small mammals. Read at your own risk. Remember the men who died for Texas Next Wednesday will mark the 168th anniversary of the Battle of San Jacinto - the great military upset that stunned the government of Gen. Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna and won Texas its independence from Mexico. Unfortunately, the day will go by like any other as time carries us further away and modem Texans slowly let history slip away. It is important that we keep our history alive to remind us of where we have been and where we are going. This is particularly important because the lessons learned from the period of the Texas Revolution can have a sig- editor's nificant beating on this state and commentary the entire nation today, by roger esdack Illegal immigration was a factor back in the 1820s and 1830s, albeit in a reverse fashion from what we see today as Anglo-Americans crossed the Red River into what was then Mexican territory. Legal immigration was also a problem for Mexico as it tried - unsuccessfully - to force cultural changes on Anglo-American settlers, also known as Texians. Modem proponents of making English the official language of this country might want to think about that. Attempts at forced assimilation and a general dis- regard for the role of law on the part of the Mexican dictator were contributing factors to the revolution. The problem with trying to force the newcomers to speak Spanish, making them convert to Catholicism, or trampling on their rights was, as Professor Camilio Martinez always put it: "You cannot tell an American what to do." At least you couldn't in 1836. Today, I'm not sure that's still the case since many Americans seem to expect government to take care of them like they are little children and are willing to give up their money and certain degrees of freedom to achieve the illusion of security. Texan sensibilities have also changed somewhat with regard to our history. Last fall, this column reported on a movement to have Texas history classes taught about the Goliad "Execution" rather than the more familiar Goliad Massacre so as to be more sensi- tive to Mexican-Americans. My response to that stupid idea was that history classes should teach the important roles played by many Tejanos in the Texas Revolution rather than gloss over the atrocities committed by the military of the Mexican dictator. There are some people out there who would dis- agree with my opinion and who are, I suppose, ashamed of the Texas Revolution. Last week, I had the good fortune to see the new motion picture account of The Alamo, and the movie is very good, although it does take some artistic liberties. The execution of David Crockett is particularly price- less. Santa Anna demands Crockett, who is on his knees and surrounded by the entire Mexican Army, discuss surrender. Crockett, played by Billy Bob Thornton, tells the interpreter that he is willing to discuss surrender and that if the Mexicans will all lay down their arms right now, he'll put in a good word for them with Gen. Hous- ton. Santa Anna doesn't see the humor in that remark and has Crockett shot. All joking aside, the essential truth of the Alamo story still comes through in the film - a small band of men fighting for what they believe in and willing to die for their rights. As the movie shows, the sacrifice of those men fueled the rage of the Texans and the Tejanos and propelled them to swift victory at San Jacinto. Upon leaving the theatre, I passed by a group of four young people - two Anglo men and two Hispan- ics. "Hey, I'm really sorry about all that," one sniveling Anglo said to the Hispanics. "Yeah, me too, dude" the other Anglo said. "I mean... I wasn't there back then and I didn't do it, but I think it was wrong, man" The Hispanics, meanwhile, shuffled from one foot to the other and looked like they couldn't figure out what the beck these two nincompoops were apologiz- ing for. I thought to myself: "This is exactly what's wrong with this country today. These kids are so ignorant about history that they think they have to make amends for Sam Houston's army kicking Santa Anna's fanny." No apology is necessary for the Texas victory at San Jacinto. To even offer one is to disgrace the memo- ries of the men who died on that field, at Goliad, and at the Alamo. The Texas rebels were not perfect men. Some of them had checkered pasts. Some were swindlers, cheats, and drunks. But I think it's safe to say they each wanted a better life than what they had left behind and a better future for their children, and they wanted to live that new life free from oppression. In the movie, Col. William Travis, played by Pat- rick Wilson, addresses that very issue as he tells the men under his command about their hopeless situation. He acknowledges that Texas means different things to all of them and then says: "I'd like to ask each of you what it is you value so highly that you are willing to fight and possibly die for. We will call that Texas." The question posed by Wilson's character was probably lost on the dudes in the theatre lobby, but it is really just as valid today. What do you value so highly? What would you die for? Your family? Your indepen- dence? Do you really remember San Jacinto and the Alamo and the sacrifices made there? Sadly, many people do not. Best friend a casualty of new epidemic I may have neglected to tell you this, but it seems that there is a horrible epi- demic raging across Hardin-Simmons Uni- versity campus. It's very contagious, and it oniy seems to affect women. The first symptom is pure and unadul- was brought along for my opinion, but my opinion was invari- ably ignored. I just had to wear it. I did not have to live with terated insanity followed by a break out of my decision for the diamonds on their left hands. This rash is rest of my life like life's lessens generally isolated to one finger in particu- Whitney obviously by carrie helms 181". It seems to be carded by men and passed on to women, because it doesn't seem to have any affect on single women like myself, except to make us extremely bitter. In one week, I kid you not, we lost fif- teen girls. Half of them were close friends of mine. I lost my best friend Whitney. Whitney is to married in August. And I am a bridesmaid. I'm going to go ahead and just be honest with you; all of my bitterness comes from pure jealousy. I would have given my right arm to be picking out dresses and invitations and looking at Bride magazines with my mother. Please note that sentence is in the past tense. I have changed my mind. Last weekend, Whitney called me up to go pick out fabric. We spent two hours circling around Abilene to find the perfect balance of shiny and textured; pink, but not too pink; brown, but not too brown. Of course, I had no say in the matter. I did. We made our choice, but not before she had harassed a few fabric store employees and asked the opinion of every- one in the store. I spent part of my Easter break with Whitney at her house. I drove down there by myself, praying out loud with despera- tion that Jesus would come back before I got to Midland. My whole purpose in going was to be measured for my bridesmaid's dress. Not only was this to be a reminder that I was not a bride, but also it was a not so gentle hint that I am not quite as thin as I used to be. Self-esteem goes through the roof. The dressmaker had finished part of Whitney's dress; and as I watched Whitney having her first fitting in her dress, I had to stifle a tear or two. Then Morn came in and started dis- cussing underwear, and just how badly Whitney needed a push-up bra. The entire store is now discussing Whitney's chest. She decides she needs a little support (no pun intended), and drags me into the conversation. "Carrie has the same problem I do. Don't you, Carrie?" So now I'm fat, single, and flat chested. Okay. I'll go with that. "Thank you for your concern, old friend, but this is your day. You need to have better cleavage than I do. Don't you worry about me. I'll be fine." My part of the mission was com- pleted in about 15 seconds before we left the dressmaker. It was only 6:00. If I ran, I could be back in Abilene before dark, watching chick flicks and eating ice cream in my dorm room. But that would be rude. I stayed on through dinner and the discussion of the invitations. They had to have the perfect balance of traditional and modem; religious, but not too religious; sweet, but not too sweet. Two hours of looking at every Web site with invitation wording, everyone asking my opinion but no one really caring what it was, and I was ready for bed. They invited me to stay on for the rest of the weekend. Tomorrow we were shop- ping for flowers and shoes and veils! Oh boy ! I politely declined. I had had all the wedding I could take. I let them know, however, that they could certainly call me when they wanted someone to sample the cake. War on Terror overrides other concerns One of the things I enjoy most about being your United States Senator is the opportunity I get to visit with you as I travel around our great state. Every April, during the legislative break in Washington, I like to update Texans on what Congress has done during the first quarter of the year. While I make stops across the state, I wanted to also take a moment and update you in this column. One of our chief accomplishments thus far was the passage of the 2005 Budget, It has passed the Senate and provides a roadmap to win the war on ter- rorism, defend the homeland, promote economic growth, and create new jobs. The budget clearly reflects our top priority of protecting Americans at home and abroad, while moving to cut the federal deficit in half, in just a few years. It is pending in the House of Representatives. We've also made great strides toward improv- ing our nation's economy. Ameri- cans are still reaping the benefits of last capit year's tax relief. We O[ received the good comment news that 308,000 by tn. kay bailey butchison jobs had been cre- ated in March, bringing the seven-month total to 759,000 jobs. To continue that trend of job creation, we are working on the JOBS Act to pre- serve work for thousands of Americans, alleviate the tax burden on manufacturing companies, and allow U.S. businesses to compete fairly with their European coun- terparts. Unfortunately, it has not passed the Senate, but we will continue to work to lower unemployment and make sure every American looking for work can find it. Passage of a comprehensive energy policy remains a burning issue for Con- gress, particularly as we suffer through record gas prices at the pump. I'm hopeful we'll be able to produce a bill that will lower costs, promote conservation, reduce our reliance on foreign sources of oil, and create jobs and opportunities at home. But overriding everything we do in Congress is the war on terror our men and women in uniform are waging everyday. We know we are up against a vicious enemy who values nothing, not even their own lives, as they seek to destroy freedom and democracy. In Washington, we'll continue to give our soldiers the resources, suplx3rt' and encouragement they need to defend our freedom and way of life. DCHD board member responds to letters In response to recent articles in the paper and the rumors around town, I feel I need to set the record straight. We have an excellent nursing home and ambulance authority with outstanding employees. I do not wish to sell or close the nursing home or fire nor cut employees' salaries. When you take the oath of office, you agree to do three things as a director of the hospital district. "The duty of care" requires you to apply the same level of care in managing the affairs of the hospital as a reasonably prudent person would apply in managing his or her business affairs. "The duty of loyalty" means avoiding conflicts, self-dealing, enrichment, and breaches of confidentiality. "The duty of obedience" means obeying the law, including statutes, enabling legislation, and bylaws. Comply- ing with these three general duties won't guarantee that you will never be sued as a director, but it should insure that you will win if a case is ever brought against you. The financial loss of the Medical Center Nursing Home for the last four years is as follows: 2000 - $171,507; 2001 -$199,911; 2002 - $44,767; 2003 - $199,779. These figures include deprecia- tion because there is no cash set aside for replacement of depreciated items, i.e. roof, refrigerators, air conditioners, or carpet. We have also canceled the professional liability insurance, which means no pro- tection from being sued by nursing home residents or families. For the first eight months of this fiscal year, we are operating at 91 percent occupancy, five percent less than expected or $66,000 less revenue than expected. The Donley County Hospital District has a bond of $1,645,000 payable until 2022 of approximately $130,000 a year. Notes payable to Community Bank are approximately $160,000. I believe that the taxpayer is at risk of higher taxes because of having no profes- sional liability insurance and operating at a continuous loss with no cash reserve for nursing home needs or ambulance author- ity needs. My goal for the next year is to hold the tax rate at the current level. I want to work towards getting the nursing home in the best possible financial health while keeping wages strong and working towards providing health insurance to keep quality employees. I want the residents to get the best physical care and be secure and happy in their nursing home environment. Their families need to feel their emotional and physical needs are satisfied. In response to Buddy Howard's letter (March 25, 2004) regarding underpaid employees, the board has never been asked by the administrator for higher wages or less hours. Alan etdl, DCI-I Dtreaar Consider MCNH residents I have been blessed to have the God given opportunity to be a volunteer at MCNH for over three years now. As a concerned citizens and tax payer, I would urge each voter, before election time, to take some of their time to visit the nursing home and talk to the residents and staff to witness the excellent care, love, and compassion that our loved ones receive at MCNH. Let's continue to see that the residents receive the best care and not lessen their quality of life. We are fortunate as a com- munity to have one of the nicest, cleanest, best run nursing homes in the area. Prayerfully consider the residents' needs when you go to vote. Judy Castmer, Lella Lalte 126th Year, Series Any erroneous reflection standing, or reputation a corporation which may ofllw rectel upon being the management.  Publither & Editor Web Master J Distribution J J Howardwick Clarendon Hedley On The Mark J Open Dtolay rates ate Inch. e lv words and 12# per word (Boxes or Thank You Notes are $fll aad 12# per word Engagement, wedding, announcements are $t0 mitred for Ami for zip codes inside of county, and Send all address IImlNtl PO BOX 79226-1110. of that letter. Letters mar, style, or length. All and must include an number for verification your chances space your letter, keep R brief. No ter ' candtdate for local lubmltted to thb