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April 15, 2004     The Clarendon Enterprise
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April 15, 2004
 

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S COUNTRY TRADER WE DELIVER WHAT CUSTOMERS WANT MOST - SAVINGS AND SELECTION! APRIL 15, 2004 PAGE 3 The Recognition of Tomorrow's +,+ Leaders From the schools in Piainuiew ,+ and our surrounding communities Watch for the Special Edition on Sunday, flpril 18, 2004 Let LeaFs flair up your prom, graduation.or other special occasion with our great authentic Mexican food and fun atmosphere. We welcome large or small parties anytime! Banquet facilities and catering services available. Mexican Restaurant 3311 Olton Road 293-5355 Open 7 days a week . Daily Lunch Specials Accept all major credit cards Individuals will be recognized Lawyersin THOUSANDS , from each campus. CB ca s e It special plaque will be awarded to each rectpient at schoorsachleuementprogramawardceremong getting millions OFA00A dy S : C (AP) -- The paid, the 18,447 20,O00plaintiffs. Rea ([ 3 .Plainvmw Call now for enrollment or information on our new competition cheer team and competition pom dance team Beginning May 1, 2004 We are also now enrolling for summer session in dance, tumbling & trampoline, cheer-gym For Ages 3 & Up * Competitive & non-competitive programs led by instructors certified in coaching, safety and judging Visit our Pro Shop for the latest in gymnastics, dance, and cheerleading apparel 293-1660 or 296-7006 say winter was ut average (AP) tell the ) dug out of of snow in York or towering zn North on the Vas about Winter in at the Oceanic Stration March 18 some i Conditions ' % State was or normal snow Was near Center becember thq ebruary, e winter for ,'s report eastern was normal, an- %nditions of the gh, Surface was than mean For the contiguous United States the December-February average temperature was 33.7 degrees Fahrenheit, 0.7 degree above average. It was the 42nd warmest winter since nationwide records began in 1895. Ten states from Mississippi to Massachusetts were colder than average, while 13 states from Michigan to New Mexico and Montana were warmer than average, the Data Center reported. Nine of the past 10 winters have been warmer than the long-term mean for the contiguous United States. There were some extremely cold January temperatures in the Northeast. Daily low temperature records were established in p many locations during the coldest time of the year, and January 2004 was the 11th coldest on record for the Northeast. Temperatures during December and February were warmer than average throughout the region and statewide temperatures for the season as a whole were closer to normal. Precipitation for the contiguous United States was near average during the December to February season, but periods of unusually heavy snow and ice storms affected many regions of the country. More than 100 inches of snow fell in Oswego County, N.Y., in January alone, thanks to a series of lake effect storms moving off Lake Ontario. One storm dumped more than 4 feet of snow over a large part of the county. Late January and early February storms in the Northern Plains led to the greatest February snowfall depth -- 26 inches -- on record in Omaha, Neb., and heavy snow and winds over 70 mph produced snow drifts up to 20 feet high in northwestern North Dakota in mid- February. And a severe January ice storm in the Carolinas resulted in weeklong power outages in some areas and more than a foot of snow fell throughout much of the Piedmont. Winter snow and rain in the western states helped ease drought in some areas. At its most recent peak in fall 2003, moderate-to-extreme drought had affected 80 percent of the West, but the affected areas fell to nearly 50 percent of the region by the end of February. Following four to five years of drought most reservoirs remained below average. This w i n t e r ' s precipitation resulted in average-to-above- average mountain snowpack levels in much of the Pacific Northwest and Intermountain West at the end of February, but snowpack was below average in large areas of the Southwest and Rockies. Melting snow is an important water source in many areas. plaintiffs in a $300 plaintiffs will get an million settlement average of $7,725 over PCB and as little as $500 contamination in each, according to Anniston will receive documents from an average of $7,725 claims administrator apiece, while their EdGentle. attorneys will get Cochran's firm millions each -- recruited plaintiffs 'including $29 million with TV commercials to the firm of and a community California celebrity meeting and helped lawyer Johnnie guide thelitigation. CochranJr. The largest legal The numbers, payment wentto the revealed in court firm of former documents and Alabama Lt. Gov. letters that plaintiffs Jere Beasley; it are receiving last received $34 million. week, have Beasley, a lead provoked a furor in attorney in the case, the Alabama city, said none of the where many people payments was already are seething excessive and his over decades of firm reduced its pollution, typical rate by 5 David Baker, a percent. local activist who "The fees were helped craft the case, approved by the said Tuesday he and court and they are his wife have not out of line for a received death case of that threats over their magnitude," he said. role, and dozens of Some are not buying people vented their it. anger at a Beverly Carmichael community meeting received a standing Monday night. Many ovation at the of the people who community meeting filed claims are when she challenged needy and had the size of lawyers' hoped for large payments. payments. "I know one thing "They're upset by that will solve all the the amount the problems we've been lawyers got," said having, if the Baker, president of attorneys gave us Community Against half the money Pollution. back," The Anniston Attorneys involved Star quoted her as in the federal case saying. said about 27 U.S. District Judge lawyers, working for U.W. Clemon of eight law firms, Birmingham and would share the $120 Alabama Circuit million approved by Judge Joel Laird of the court for legal Anniston approved fees. That works out two settlements to an average of reached last year more than $4 million between Monsanto for each lawyer. Co., its spinoff After the attorneys company Solutia, COME TO PLAINVIEW FOR GREAT SHOPPING AND FOR THE GREAT HOSPITALITY The federal ease was settled for $300 IRY million, the state case for another $300 million. Both involved lawsuits WEEKLOOK claimed that pollution from a factory that made PCBs in Anniston l endangered their health or dam;lged their property. In the state court case, the money was ]  ]n| used to settle about I00LK' 3,500 claims, with $114 million going to t lawyers and $15 million for expenses. COME Many people with state claims received payments exceeding ,00oo, ooo. In the federal case, the money went to resolve claims from five times as many IR0! people. That reduced the amount each person received. TIEHtSTT00SCOIHTRflSl SHTWAYTOHIOltIBf HItRfiSli, ClLL fOIi LOW IM00IPIRI0II00 cost. can make ou more S COUNTRY TRADER WE DELIVER WHAT CUSTOMERS WANT MOST - SAVINGS AND SELECTION! APRIL 15, 2004 PAGE 3 The Recognition of Tomorrow's. Leaders From the schools in Piainuiew and our surrounding communities Watch for the Special Edition on Sunday, flpril 18, 2004 Let LeaFs flair up your prom, graduation.or other special occasion wxth our great authentic Mexican food and fun atmosphere. We welcome large or small parties anytime! Banquet facilities and catering services available. Mexican Restaurant 3311 Olton Road 293-5355 Open 7 days a week . Daily Lunch Specials Accept all major credit cards Individuals will be recognized Lawyersin TItOUSANDS from each campus. CB ca s e It special plaque will be awarded to each rectpient at schoorsachleuementprogramawardceremon9 getting millions OFA00A BIRMINGHAM, AIa. and other costs are and more than PAD[RS dy S : C (AP) -- The paid, the 18,447 20,000plaintiffs. Rea e t 3 ,Plainvmw Call now for enrollment or information on our new competition cheer team and competition pom dance team Beginning May 1, 2004 We are also now enrolling for summer session in dance, tumbling & trampoline, cheer-gym For Ages 3 & Up r Competitive & non-competitive programs led by instructors certified in coaching, safety and judging Visit our Pro Shop for the latest in gymnastics, dance, and cheerleading apparel 293-1660 or 296-7006 say winter was ut average (AP) tell the ) dug out of of snow in York or towering m North on the Was about Winter in at the Oceanic Stration March 18 some t COnditions ' % State was or normal snow Was near Center December thq ebruary, e winter for ,'s report eastern was normal, an- %nditions of the gh, Surface was than mean For the contiguous United States the December-February average temperature was 33.7 degrees Fahrenheit, 0.7 degree above average. It was the 42nd warmest winter since nationwide records began in 1895. Ten states from Mississippi to Massachusetts were colder than average, while 13 states from Michigan to New Mexico and Montana were warmer than average, the Data Center reported. Nine of the past 10 winters have been warmer than the long-term mean for the contiguous United States. There were some extremely cold January temperatures in the Northeast. Daily low temperature records were established in p many locations during the coldest time of the year, and January 2004 was the 11th coldest on record for the Northeast. Temperatures during December and February were warmer than average throughout the region and statewide temperatures for the season as a whole ,were closer to normal. Precipitation for the contiguous United States was near average during the December to February season, but periods of unusually heavy snow and ice storms affected many regions of the country. More than 100 inches of snow fell in Oswego County, N.Y., in January alone, thanks to a series of lake effect storms moving off Lake Ontario. One storm dumped more than 4 feet of snow over a large part of the county. Late January and early February storms in the Northern Plains led to the greatest February snowfall depth -- 26 inches on record in Omaha, Nob., and heavy snow and winds over 70 mph produced snow drifts up to 20 feet high in northwestern North Dakota in mid- February. And a severe January ice storm in the Carolinas resulted in weeklong power outages in some areas and more than a foot of snow fell throughout much of the Piedmont. Winter snow and rain in the western states helped ease drought in some areas. At its most recent peak in fall 2003, moderate-to-extreme drought had affected 80 percent of the West, but the affected areas fell to nearly 50 percent of the region by the end of February. Following four to five years of drought most reservoirs remained below average. This w i n t e r ' s precipitation resulted in average-to-above- average mountain snowpack levels in much of the Pacific Northwest and Intermountain West at the end of February, but snowpack was below average in large areas of the Southwest and Rockies. Melting snow is an important water source in many areas. plaintiffs in a $300 plaintiffs will get an million settlement average of $7,725 over PCB and as little as $500 contaminaHon in each, according to Anniston will receive documents from an average of $7,725 claims administrator apiece, while their EdGentle. attorneys will get Cochran's firm millions each -- recruited plaintiffs 'including $29 million with TV commercials to the firm of and a community California celebrity meeting and helped lawyer Johnnie guide thelitigation. CochranJr. The largest legal The numbers, payment wentto the revealed in court firm of former documents and Alabama Lt. Gov. letters that plaintiffs Jere Beasley; it are receiving last received $34 million. week, have Beasley, a lead provoked a furor in attorney in the case, the Alabama city, said none of the where many people payments was already are seething excessive and his over decades of firm reduced its pollution, typical rate by 5 David Baker, a percent. local activist who "The fees were helped craft the case, approved by the said Tuesday he and court and they are his wife have not out of line for a received death case of that threats over their magnitude," he said. role, and dozens of Some are not buying people vented their it. anger at a Beverly Carmichael community meeting received a standing Monday night. Many ovation at the of the people who community meeting filed claims are when she challenged needy and had the size of lawyers' hoped for large payments. payments. "I know one thing "They're upset by that will solve all the the amount the problems we've been lawyers got," said having, if the Baker, president of attorneys gave us Community Against half the money Pollution. back," The Anniston Attorneys involved Star quoted her as in the federal case saying. said about 27 U.S. District Judge lawyers, working for U.W. Clemon of eight law firms, Birmingham and would share the $120 Alabama Circuit million approved by Judge Joel Laird of the court for legal Anniston approved fees. That works out two settlements to an average of reached last year more than $4 million between Monsanto for each lawyer. Co., its spinoff After the attorneys company Solutia, COME TO PLAINVIEW FOR GREAT SHOPPING AND FOR THE GREAT HOSPITALITY The federal ease was settled for $300 IRY million, the state case for another $300 million. Both involved lawsuits WEEKLOOK claimed that pollution from a factory that made PCBs in Anniston AIT endangered their health or dam;lged their property. In the state court case, the money was ]  ]D| used to settle about I00LK' 3,500 claims, with $114 million going to t lawyers and $15 million for expenses. COME Many people with state claims received payments exceeding ,00o0o00 In the federal case, the money went to resolve claims from five times as many IROWD! people. That reduced the amount each person received. TIEHtSTT00SCOgNTIYISI SiIHTWlYTOHIOIL00BY HltRfiSHi, CNL foil [O/ IMIAPtRI0II00 ost. m maire you more