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Clarendon, Texas
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July 15, 2004     The Clarendon Enterprise
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1 rii I II ,,tt,f ..... till ...... l!,,I I,I,I,, if ,l.!,, iI,, ill, I 07.15.2004 SERIES 3, VOL. XV, NO. 30 Established 1878. Price: 75 f the Plains, K takes you of "Life's are now open FSA Corn- softball players e the Little League out where all the are. *raore as The Enterprise edition/ rebates rYear to date Comptrol- Strayhorn said state received $1.18 in June, to June 10 consecutive tax growth. 2004, state is up 7.7 percent same point in City of Claren- tax rebate fell to $16,660; but the than five percent Year-to-date total of rebate rose to $425.79 one year posted a 2.82 and received a sent of $214 cities, up 2.7 to July 2003. city sales are up 8 percent same period last Sales tax collections tax allocations to mostly repre- CCUrred in May. ice cream this Friday for How- ice cream social Friendship Club is held each for the law enforcement department and volunteer fire They will cookies, home- and water. are invited to l'iowardwick city 16, 2004, and the entertain- to be Channel own All- will be lea- Channel this quail, and pheas- in Donley and of Outdoor 16 at 10:30 at 12:30 a.m. The appear on the 17 at 7 a.m. to close for )n ENTERPRISE Friday, July 16, Press Associa- Will re-open and deadlines for next THE CLARENDON NEWS & THE DONLEY COUNTY LEADER Burglary suspect arrested Deputy Kelly Hill (left) and paramedic Anna Summers (right) stand with George Howard as his home burns Friday morning, p.o,o by p, Robe.t.on. Lightning ignites blaze Early morning fire destroys home of Clarendon couple By Roger Estlack & Ashlee Kldd A southwest Clarendon home was lost to fire after it was hit by lightning early Friday morn- ing. Lightning struck a second story addition to a railroad caboose that was attached to the south side of the three-story home of George and Dixie Howard at 702 S. Leroy Street, according to Assis- tant Clarendon Fire Chief Patrick Robertson. "It caught the upstairs of the caboose on fire. Wind blew the fire under the cave of the house and into the attic," Robeson said. The 911 dispatcher received the call of the fire at 5:44 a.m., and Donley County Deputy Kelly Hill, who had been watching lightning in the area, arrived on the scene at 5:46. The first of six units from the Clarendon Volunteer Fire Department arrived at 5:52. Fifteen firefighters responded to the call and had the blaze larg,l) under control by 8 a.m., but they were unable to save the structure. "If the wind hadn't hit and if we had hit with water a few minutes sooner, we probably could have contained it," Robertson said. "The guys did a heck of a job fighting it." The top two floors of the house were destroyed, and most of the contents on the first floor received smoke and water damage. No fire- men were allowed on the roof or inside the struc- ture due to the possibility of collapse. Most of the fire units were released by noon, and personnel were rotated out with one unil watching over the site until 6:40 p.m. Robertson said the fire department pumped an estimated 200,00O gallolL, of vatcr to balt}c the blaze and said he was informed by Greenbelt Water Authority that the level in the west water tower dropped by ! 8 feet. Robertson said fireman Jason Christopher was one of the first to respond and had to be taken by ambulance to an Amarillo hospital where he was treated for smoke inhalation and heat exhaus- tion. He was released the same day. Several other men had to be treated on the scene for smoke inhalation and heat exhaustion. FSA approves managed grazing, haying of CRP Cutting hay and grazing livestock on land enrolled in the U.S. Depart- ment of Agriculture's Conservation Reserve Program, in the absence of a weather-related emergency, is now an option for Texas producers. Bruce Ferguson, County Execu- tive Director for the Donley County Farm Service Agency, announced today that managed haying and grazing is allowed on CRP lands. Haying is approved in Texas July 2 through September 29, and grazing is approved beginning July 2 and ending October 29, 2004. The start- ing date for both haying and graz- ing is tied to the end of the primary nesting and brood rearing season in the state. Prior to the 2002 Farm Bill, commercial use of CRP land was generally prohibited except for weather-related emergencies such as droughts. To take advantage of the haying and grazing options, producers must modify existing conservation plans for the CRP acreage to include man- aged haying and grazing practices. The plans must be developed in conjunction with USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) or one of its technical ser- vice providers. Producers must also agree to cer- tain terms and conditions, including signing an agreement to re-establish, at the producer's own cost, any cover destroyed or damaged 'as a result of haying or grazing and to remove all hay within 10 days of being notified that the managed haying and grazing season has ended. Ferguson emphasized that for acreage that is hayed or grazed, annual rental payments producers receive for enrolling land into CRP will be reduced by 25 percent. Under this enhanced CRP provi- sion, producers can cut hay or graze See 'CRP' on page 3. SBA disaster loan deadline August 12 FT. WORTH - Businesses in some Texas and Oklahoma counties have until August 12, 2004, to file applications for low-interest disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). The SBA's Economic Injury Disaster Loans are available for businesses dependent on farmers and ranchers sustaining crop losses due to drought that occurred from January 1,2003, and continuing. Farmers and ranchers are not eligible. However, nurseries that are victims of drought disasters can apply. Businesses in the following counties are eligible to apply: Texas: Collingsworth, Donley, Gray, Hemp- hill, Roberts, and Wheeler. Okla- homa: Beckham and Roger Mills. Applications and further infor- mation can be obtained by calling the SBA toll-free at 1-800-366-6303 or TDD 817-267-4688 for the hearilig impaired. These loans are intended to assist businesses in offsetting work- ing capital losses which they suf- fered as result of the severe weather reducing the crop income of the area farmers and ranchers. Small busi- nesses claiming to have been physi- cally injured by the disaster are not Helping hands Emily Masters of Arlington and Alyssa Myers of Ft. Worth paint a handrail at the home of Clarendon resident Billie Taylor Monday afternoon. The two were part of a team of 32 young people and 16 adults from the Methodist Central Texas Conference Youth Missions who will be working here through Friday to help local eligible, residents by doing handiwork. By Roger Estlack, Clarendon Enterprise A Clarendon man was arrested last week lk)llowing an investigation of a rash of residential burglaries. Shane Klinnert, age 36, remained in the Donley County Jail Monday, facing charges of burglary of a habi- tation and violating probation. Sheriff Butch Blackburn said Klinnert was arrested last Thursday and arraigned the following day by County Judge Jack Hall. Bond was set at the $25,000 for the burglary charge, but no bond was set for the probation violation. Blackburn said the arrest cleared ten cases, four of which had hap- pened the day of the arrest. One case dated back two months, and the remainder had occurred in the last two weeks. The crimes occurred across the county in residences from Ashtola on the west, inside the city of Clarendon, and to Lelia Lake on the east. Prescription medications were the primary items stolen during the burglaries, Sheriff Blackburn said. but some meat, a fan, and a television were also taken. Klinnert also reportedly stole a radio from a volunteer firefighter's home and used it to keep track of local law enforcement personnel. All the missing property in the cases, other than the pills, have been recovered, the sheriff said. Blackburn credited the arrest to two observant citizens who noticed the suspect's vehicle at the locations of two of the burglaries. "Without the help of two citi- zens, we would not have been able to clear these cases as quickly as we did/' the sheriff said. Klinnert was on probation for a DWI charge, Blackburn said. Transportation Commission meets July 29 CHILDRESS - The Texas Transportation Commission will hold its first ever-monthly meet- ing in Childress on July 29, 2004, according to the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). The meeting is scheduled for 9 a.m. at the Childress City Audito- rium. The meetings, which are open 1 to the public, are usually held in Austin. However, the commission periodically holds meetings in loca- tions around the state, as very few citizens of Texas have the opportu- nity to make it to Austin to see the commission in action. The rotations of these commis- sion meetings around the state gives all Texans an opportunity to partici- pate in state transportation decision making. The five transportation commis- sioners, appointed by the Governor, oversee all statewide activities of TxDOT. This includes the approval of major construction and mainte- nance projects in Texas, approval of enhancement projects, State Infra- structure Bank grants, and general business. The commission members six-year terms are staggered, each appoimment is generally made every two years. The governor designates one member to serve as chair. The chair is referred to as the commis- sioner of transportatitm. Members of the TxDOT Trans- portation Commission are: Chair - Rick WiUiamson of Weatherford, and Commission Members John W. Johnson of Houston, Robert L. Nich- ols of Jacksonville, Hope Andrade of San Antonio, and Ted Houghton of .oD,  E1 Paso Ente p s gila Photo " " 1 rii I II ,,tt,f ..... till ...... l!,,I I,I,I,, if ,l.!,, iI,, ill, I 07.15.2004 SERIES 3, VOL. XV, NO. 30 Established 1878. Price: 75 f the Plains, K takes you of "Life's are now open FSA Corn- softball players e the Little League out where all the are. *raore as The Enterprise edition/ rebates rYear to date Comptrol- Strayhorn said state received $1.18 in June, to June 10 consecutive tax growth. 2004, state is up 7.7 percent same point in City of Claren- tax rebate fell to $16,660; but the than five percent Year-to-date total of rebate rose to $425.79 one year posted a 2.82 and received a sent of $214 cities, up 2.7 to July 2003. city sales are up 8 percent same period last Sales tax collections tax allocations to mostly repre- CCUrred in May. ice cream this Friday for How- ice cream social Friendship Club is held each for the law enforcement department and volunteer fire They will cookies, home- and water. are invited to l'iowardwick city 16, 2004, and the entertain- to be Channel own All- will be lea- Channel this quail, and pheas- in Donley and of Outdoor 16 at 10:30 at 12:30 a.m. The appear on the 17 at 7 a.m. to close for )n ENTERPRISE Friday, July 16, Press Associa- Will re-open and deadlines for next THE CLARENDON NEWS & THE DONLEY COUNTY LEADER Burglary suspect arrested Deputy Kelly Hill (left) and paramedic Anna Summers (right) stand with George Howard as his home burns Friday morning, p.o,o by p, Robe.t.on. Lightning ignites blaze Early morning fire destroys home of Clarendon couple By Roger Estlack & Ashlee Kldd A southwest Clarendon home was lost to fire after it was hit by lightning early Friday morn- ing. Lightning struck a second story addition to a railroad caboose that was attached to the south side of the three-story home of George and Dixie Howard at 702 S. Leroy Street, according to Assis- tant Clarendon Fire Chief Patrick Robertson. "It caught the upstairs of the caboose on fire. Wind blew the fire under the cave of the house and into the attic," Robeson said. The 911 dispatcher received the call of the fire at 5:44 a.m., and Donley County Deputy Kelly Hill, who had been watching lightning in the area, arrived on the scene at 5:46. The first of six units from the Clarendon Volunteer Fire Department arrived at 5:52. Fifteen firefighters responded to the call and had the blaze larg.l) under control by 8 a.m., but they were unable to save the structure. "If the wind hadn't hit and if we had hit with water a few minutes sooner, we probably could have contained it," Robertson said. "The guys did a heck of a job fighting it." The top two floors of the house were destroyed, and most of the contents on the first floor received smoke and water damage. No fire- men were allowed on the roof or inside the struc- ture due to the possibility of collapse. Most of the fire units were released by noon, and personnel were rotated out with one unil watching over the site until 6:40 p.m. Robertson said the fire department pumped an estimated 200,00O gallolL, of vatcr to balt}c the blaze and said he was informed by Greenbelt Water Authority that the level in the west water tower dropped by ! 8 feet. Robertson said fireman Jason Christopher was one of the first to respond and had to be taken by ambulance to an Amarillo hospital where he was treated for smoke inhalation and heat exhaus- tion. He was released the same day. Several other men had to be treated on the scene for smoke inhalation and heat exhaustion. FSA approves managed grazing, haying of CRP Cutting hay and grazing livestock on land enrolled in the U.S. Depart- ment of Agriculture's Conservation Reserve Program, in the absence of a weather-related emergency, is now an option for Texas producers. Bruce Ferguson, County Execu- tive Director for the Donley County Farm Service Agency, announced today that managed haying and grazing is allowed on CRP lands. Haying is approved in Texas July 2 through September 29, and grazing is approved beginning July 2 and ending October 29, 2004. The start- ing date for both haying and graz- ing is tied to the end of the primary nesting and brood rearing season in the state. Prior to the 2002 Farm Bill, commercial use of CRP land was generally prohibited except for weather-related emergencies such as droughts. To take advantage of the haying and grazing options, producers must modify existing conservation plans for the CRP acreage to include man- aged haying and grazing practices. The plans must be developed in conjunction with USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) or one of its technical ser- vice providers. Producers must also agree to cer- tain terms and conditions, including signing an agreement to re-establish, at the producer's own cost, any cover destroyed or damaged 'as a result of haying or grazing and to remove all hay within 10 days of being notified that the managed haying and grazing season has ended. Ferguson emphasized that for acreage that is hayed or grazed, annual rental payments producers receive for enrolling land into CRP will be reduced by 25 percent. Under this enhanced CRP provi- sion, producers can cut hay or graze See 'CRP' on page 3. SBA disaster loan deadline August 12 FT. WORTH - Businesses in some Texas and Oklahoma counties have until August 12, 2004, to file applications for low-interest disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). The SBA's Economic Injury Disaster Loans are available for businesses dependent on farmers and ranchers sustaining crop losses due to drought that occurred from January 1,2003, and continuing. Farmers and ranchers are not eligible. However, nurseries that are victims of drought disasters can apply. Businesses in the following counties are eligible to apply: Texas: Collingsworth, Donley, Gray, Hemp- hill, Roberts, and Wheeler. Okla- homa: Beckham and Roger Mills. Applications and further infor- mation can be obtained by calling the SBA toll-free at 1-800-366-6303 or TDD 817-267-4688 for the hearilig impaired. These loans are intended to assist businesses in offsetting work- ing capital losses which they suf- fered as result of the severe weather reducing the crop income of the area farmers and ranchers. Small busi- nesses claiming to have been physi- cally injured by the disaster are not Helping hands Emily Masters of Arlington and Alyssa Myers of Ft. Worth paint a handrail at the home of Clarendon resident Billie Taylor Monday afternoon. The two were part of a team of 32 young people and 16 adults from the Methodist Central Texas Conference Youth Missions who will be working here through Friday to help local eligible, residents by doing handiwork. By Roger Estlack, Clarendon Enterprise A Clarendon man was arrested last week lk)llowing an investigation of a rash of residential burglaries. Shane Klinnert, age 36, remained in the Donley County Jail Monday, facing charges of burglary of a habi- tation and violating probation. Sheriff Butch Blackburn said Klinnert was arrested last Thursday and arraigned the following day by County Judge Jack Hall. Bond was set at the $25,000 for the burglary charge, but no bond was set for the probation violation. Blackburn said the arrest cleared ten cases, four of which had hap- pened the day of the arrest. One case dated back two months, and the remainder had occurred in the last two weeks. The crimes occurred across the county in residences from Ashtola on the west, inside the city of Clarendon, and to Lelia Lake on the east. Prescription medications were the primary items stolen during the burglaries, Sheriff Blackburn said. but some meat, a fan. and a television were also taken. Klinnert also reportedly stole a radio from a volunteer firefighter's home and used it to keep track of local law enforcement personnel. All the missing property in the cases, other than the pills, have been recovered, the sheriff said. Blackburn credited the arrest to two observant citizens who noticed the suspect's vehicle at the locations of two of the burglaries. "Without the help of two citi- zens, we would not have been able to clear these cases as quickly as we did/' the sheriff said. Klinnert was on probation for a DWI charge, Blackburn said. Transportation Commission meets July 29 CHILDRESS - The Texas Transportation Commission will hold its first ever-monthly meet- ing in Childress on July 29, 2004, according to the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). The meeting is scheduled for 9 a.m. at the Childress City Audito- rium. The meetings, which are open 1 to the public, are usually held in Austin. However, the commission periodically holds meetings in loca- tions around the state, as very few citizens of Texas have the opportu- nity to make it to Austin to see the commission in action. The rotations of these commis- sion meetings around the state gives all Texans an opportunity to partici- pate in state transportation decision making. The five transportation commis- sioners, appointed by the Governor, oversee all statewide activities of TxDOT. This includes the approval of major construction and mainte- nance projects in Texas, approval of enhancement projects, State Infra- structure Bank grants, and general business. The commission members six-year terms are staggered, each appoimment is generally made every two years. The governor designates one member to serve as chair. The chair is referred to as the commis- sioner of transportatitm. Members of the TxDOT Trans- portation Commission are: Chair - Rick WiUiamson of Weatherford, and Commission Members John W. Johnson of Houston, Robert L. Nich- ols of Jacksonville, Hope Andrade of San Antonio, and Ted Houghton of .oD,  E1 Paso Ente p s gila Photo " "