Newspaper Archive of
The Clarendon Enterprise
Clarendon, Texas
Lyft
August 5, 2004     The Clarendon Enterprise
PAGE 2     (2 of 24 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 2     (2 of 24 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
August 5, 2004
 

Newspaper Archive of The Clarendon Enterprise produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2018. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




2 AiY ' "iii ........... The Clarendon Enterprise August 5, 2004 WARNING: The following columr is an editorial (i.e. an opinion, a point ol view) and may contain ideas with which some readers may freely disagree. It could be harmful to liberals, socialists, and other small mamrna=s. Read at your own risk. Dems' further adventures in Beantown I knew it. I just knew the Democrats would come through with high entertainment as Fib Fest 2004 con- cluded last week, and 1 was not disappointed. Let's get right to the analysis and start with our good friend, Uncle Teddy Kennedy, who spoke last Tuesday and reaffirmed that the Dems do in fact live in an alternate reality. "There are those," Kennedy said, meaning Republicans, "who seek to divide us. One community against another. ... Whites against blacks. Men against women. Straights against editor's gays." That was just priceless. Here commentary is the guy who is the epitome by roger est[ack of the Democratic Party, which is the party that governs by appealing to people on the basis of their gender, their race, and their income. Democrats routinely paint their opponents as being "racist" or "sexist" or "homophobic;" and they con- stantly denigrate Americans who have done well for themselves financially by implying they must have done it on the backs of the poor and therefore should be taxed through the nose. Next, Teddy decided to use one of the Dems' favorite tactics - fear. For years now, when all else fails, Democrats always try to just scare the pants off everyone. (There's a joke in there somewhere about Teddy and pants coming off, but I'm holding back.) "Today, we say the only thing we have to fear is four more years of George Bush," Teddy said in a weak imitation of FDR. Yes, my friends, according to the impartial Ken- nedy, if George W. Bush is reelected, Social Security and Medicare will be doomed, Jim Crow will return from the political graveyard, and corporations will turn our country into a blackened wasteland from dingy sea to dingy sea.' Also on Tuesday, the Democrats trotted out the most obnoxious little girl they could find - a 12-year- old named liana Wexler, who is wound up, misin- formed, and a dead-on look-alike for Little Orphan Annie. In a speech that for me reinforced the idea that people shouldn't be able to vote until they are 18, Wexler used her ABCs to outline some goals for the greatest nation on Earth and enthusiastically endorsed the idea of a national "No Name Calling Day" where all the candidates are nice to each other. I thought that's what McCain-Feingold was sup- posed to be, but I guess I was wrong. But Annie... I mean... Wexler really got the del- egates going with this: "When our Vice President had a disagreement with the Democratic Senator, he used a really bad word. If I said that word, I would be put in a 'time out.' I think he should be put in a 'time out.'" The brat was referring to a June incident in which Vice President Dick Cheney had finally had enough of the bellicose tactics of Sen. Patrick J. Leahy and told the honorable gentleman from Vermont on the Senate floor to "go [verb] yourself' with the verb in question being the vile F-word. Personally, while I don't condone the use of that word, I thought Cheney's verbiage was used in excel- lent context, and I would have followed it with "...and the donkey you rode in on." It's something I've wanted to tell Leahy for a long time - and Tom Daschle, too, for that matter. But that's just me. What Wexler failed to mention in her lovely, fist- pumping speech was that her hero John F. Kerry used that very same verb late last year in an interview with ROLLING STONE, in which he lamented how President Bush has "[verb]ed up" the war in Iraq. Maybe he should be in a "time out;' too. Moving on now, little John Boy Edwards spoke on Wednesday. There was nothing worth noting. Thursday was the big night. John E Kerry came out and actually accepted the Democratic nomination for president and then went into a long-winded, unin- spiting speech. He touched on the Democrats' favorite line and alluded to President Bush's allegedly lying about weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. "Saying there are weapons of mass destruction in Iraq doesn't make it so" Kerry said. I suppose if he were president, Kerry would ignore American intelligence, British intelligence, Russian intelligence, and the common knowledge of past usage of chemical weapons by a megalomaniac dictator and instead rely on a Ouija board and the United Nations' version of Inspector Clouseau before taking decisive action by bombing an aspirin factory. The Senator criticized the Bush administration's' energy policy saying that the Democrats "value an America that controls its own destiny because it's finally and forever independent of Mideast oil?' But in reality, the Democrats value the life a hand- ful of caribou even more. Kerry also went on a rant about family values saying, "And it is time for those who tall about family values to start valuing families." Well, according to CNN.com, John E Kerry's family is valued quite highly since he is the wealthiest person in the United States Senate with a net worth estimated at $164 million. Forbes magazine values his wife even more and says her net worth is more than $500 million. There you have him, dear readers. The candidate of the middle class and the workingman. Cell phones cause miscommunication I hate cell phones. Maybe I've talked about this before, I'm not sure. You know those commercials where the guy hears wrong and instead of "How are the kids" he thinks she says "Flour the kids"? The kids are standing in the kitchen white from head to toe. I had one of those experiences this week. My mother and I were in town the other day running errands. We were just getting ready to leave the city limits and head for home when Mom's cell phone started ringing. Once I uncovered her purse and tossed through the ruins of gum wrappers and keys and tubes of chapstick, I finally located the phone. It was my Dad. "Hey, Dadoo. What up?" I like to call my dad Dadoo like that. He thinks it's funny. "Have y'all left town yet?" We were cruising past the last 55 mph speed limit sign, which, incidentally, I was obeying. "Nope. What do you need?" I signaled and turned around, heading back m town. "I need you to run by Evans Fertil- izer and pick up a roast broccoli and two elves." "Say what? We're bringing lunch. We don't need broc- coli from Evans. And it's July, Pops." Why would he want elves? "What? Go to Evans and tell them I need a nose bob key life's lessons by carrie helms and a couple of smells?' Nose bob key? Sounded like some new-fangled and seriously painful tool for body piercing. Surely he wasn't having his mid-life crisis now. Dad turned 50 in September. By now it was a little late for that. Any kind of piercing would be in poor taste at this stage of the game. "Dad, I'm all for self-expression and what not, but are you sure?" "What are you talking about, Carrie? Are you okay?" I double-checked the vitals. Pulse, okay. No fever. "Yeah, Dad. I'm cool?" "Huh? I thought you said you were bringing lunch?" "We are." 'q'hen why are you full?" "Cool, Dad. I said I was cool. I'm not sick." "Okay. Can you hear me?" He asked slowly and loudly in case I couldn't, I guess. "Yes, Dad." "Okay. I need a goat lard cheese and tubed bells?' "Say again, Papa Goose. Didn't copy." "Carrie! Go to E/ans. I said I need a hose-barb T and two L's." "A hose-barb T:' 'What's right. Finally!" Ironically enough, once I finally heard him right, it didn't much matter. I still had no idea what in the heck he was talking about. "Forget it. I'm calling Evans. They'll know what I'm talking about. Just go in, and Joe will hand it to you. I'm hanging up the phone now." Apparently a hose-barb T is some kind of t-shaped thing you put on the end of a hose to distribute herbicide. Who would have thought a simple errand could become so complicated? Softball girls exemplify regional values As a tag-along to the state Little League softball tournament for 11- and 12-year-old girls in Waco July 25-28, I'was reminded of some values we often take for granted. The High Plains All-Stars, also called the Twisters, were a bunch of ordinary girls from McLean, Clarendon, Groom, and Hedley. Most were pretty new to softball but had excelled on their town teams and had been selected for the All-Stars. Under coaches Brian Byron, Johnny Haynes, and Daniel Ford, the girls prac- ticed nearly every day in hot weather, riding back and forth from Clarendon to McLean. Working until 10 p.m. some nights on pitching, hitting, and just catch- ing the ball, the girls from four towns got to know each other and became better than they thought they could be. In Dumas, they beat an El Paso team two of three games, surprising themselves by qualifying for the trip to Waco. Friends and family in all the towns also surprised them by donating plenty of money for the trip, which turned out to be almost six days because when they got to Waco, they beat the South Texas team from Willacy County. It was the first win at state for a Panhandle team that anyone could remember. After that, the girls ran into a buzz saw, hometown Waco Midway, whose players had been together for years and which team had won the national title 10 times. It didn't quite seem fair, but after a loss, the Panhandle girls - together for three weeks - gave the Helotes team from San Antonio a good game before bowing out gracefully. The girls who learned to play and win were Ashley Byron, Shed Haynes, Chelsey Sims, Amber Staton and Erin Vassey of McLean; DanieUe Ford, Dominique Mason and Brandi Mays of Clarendon; Maddi Wieberg of Groom; and Jasie Sargent of Hedley. Contributing to the team earlier had been Racheal Hopkins of Groom and Lauren Shelton of Clarendon. The Little League tournament director complimented the fans from High Plains and Helotes for their good behavior, and the umpire said he was impressed by the camaraderie and fair play of our High Plains girls. So I was heartened by the friendships and success molded by these inexperienced girls, something that happens often across our far-flung Panhandle in youth sports, church ministries, and other areas. And I was impressed by the unity that can be achieved by people from across our region when they have a common goal. From girls' softball to churches to city, county, and state government, we should get together more. Each town and each group is one of former President Bush's ,thou- sand points of light;" and when they shine through the dark, we need to let people know. Mike Haynes, Amarillo Garden thieves lack common decency I do not know Mr. George Howard or his family very well. I do know that melons taste sweetest when his come to market and tomatoes begin to actually taste like tomatoes when his redden. So, by inference, I know that like all those who work the land to feed us, the Howards labor long hours and fight many battles to grow the food with which we are blessed. The Howard family and every other person who farms or ranches, put a little bit of themselves into very facet of the complicated task of feeding a nation. I wishI could say I suspect those who stole into Mr. Howard's fields by night to loot his harvest were space aliens, feral pigs, or Arab terrorists; but alas, aliens from outer space and wild swine do not leave tire tracks through the rows of plants, and CNN has not reported any terrorist interest in Texas okra, black-eyed peas, squash, or cucumbers. Therefore I must reluctantly conclude that those stealing Mr. Howard's months of concern, hard work, investment, and high hopes were fellow Texans, folks from right here in Donley County. Folks who watched Mr. Howard plant, water, tend, and nurture his crops before slinking in by night to steal the results of other people's hard work. No use trying to put a good face on it. These people were stealing to sell. If they had needed food to feed a family, it would have been available from a dozen sources, including Mr. Howard himself. Which makes me ashamed for my fellow citizens even if they do not have the decency to be ashamed of themselves. I could almost have more respect for a masked man with a gun as opposed to sneak thieves in the night. Rudyard Kipling once said that the true measure of a civilization is its abil- ity to enforce the unenforceable laws of common decency. Perhaps it is time we all became a bit more concerned about the state of "civilization" here in Donley County. Bill Russell, Clarendon US must st00iy focused in fighting terror Nearly tlee years later, the images, sounds, and emotions are still as clear as the cloudless sky that September morn- ing. It was the wake up call that came too late. September 1 lth opened the world's eyes, and last week the 9-11 Commission opened our minds. After 2.5 million pages of documents and over 1,200 individual interviews, the 9- 11 Commission issued a final report on our security shortcomings before September 11, 2001. No one will dispute that we were unprepared for the terrorist attacks, but the Commission's findings help pinpoint our weaknesses and assert that September 1 lth was a "failure of policy, management, capability and, above all, a failure of imagination:' As the Com- mission reminds us, capitol we are safer today than we were on comment September llth, by stn. kay baiky tchison but we are not safe. Their recommendations provide us the opportunity to re-evaluate our home- land defense three years after the horrific attacks. It is important to remember, however, that over the course of the last three years we've made great strides to secure our people and our nation. We have imple- mented a new policy on terrorism by holding to account terrorist groups and the states that sponsor them. No longer will we allow dangerous threats to gather overseas unchecked. As the 9-11 Commission declared, this is the end of the beginning, Our nation and world are safer today than they were three years ago, but our job is far from over. We will stay the course, we will win the war on terror, and freedom will prevail. This paper's first duty IS that is fit to unbiased by any edRorlal opinion. Any erroneous reflectJ0 standing, or reputation corporation which of 11 l,,mdee rected upon being the Publisher & Editor Web Master I Copy Editor Distribution Clarendon m, ae l Howardwick I Clarendon Hedley On The Mark l pbot Open Display rates ate : inch. Claifled Ads are t words and 12 per word (Boxes or spedal t Thank You Notes are and 12 par word Engagement, wedding' annouocemer ml for ' Net altldel =rod office by Monday be submitted Deadlines may issues. for zip codes inside of county, and $40 Send all addreSS , pO Box 79226-1110. expressed do not neoessadly ref sion of a letter does not of that letter. Letters mar, style, or length. All and must include an number for verlfltlon 1 your chances for space your keep It Ief. No lattert candidates for local submitted to this e The Texas Flt THE BON N,' wRh February 1889; 189 /MIIII, February May 1908; 11 I 1929; 2 AiY ' "iii ........... The Clarendon Enterprise August 5, 2004 WARNING: The following columr is an editorial (i.e. an opinion, a point ol view) and may contain ideas with which some readers may freely disagree. It could be harmful to liberals, socialists, and other small mamrna=s. Read at your own risk. Dems' further adventures in Beantown I knew it. I just knew the Democrats would come through with high entertainment as Fib Fest 2004 con- cluded last week, and 1 was not disappointed. Let's get right to the analysis and start with our good friend, Uncle Teddy Kennedy, who spoke last Tuesday and reaffirmed that the Dems do in fact live in an alternate reality. "There are those," Kennedy said, meaning Republicans, "who seek to divide us. One community against another. ... Whites against blacks. Men against women. Straights against editor's gays." That was just priceless. Here commentary is the guy who is the epitome by roger est[ack of the Democratic Party, which is the party that governs by appealing to people on the basis of their gender, their race, and their income. Democrats routinely paint their opponents as being "racist" or "sexist" or "homophobic;" and they con- stantly denigrate Americans who have done well for themselves financially by implying they must have done it on the backs of the poor and therefore should be taxed through the nose. Next, Teddy decided to use one of the Dems' favorite tactics - fear. For years now, when all else fails, Democrats always try to just scare the pants off everyone. (There's a joke in there somewhere about Teddy and pants coming off, but I'm holding back.) "Today, we say the only thing we have to fear is four more years of George Bush," Teddy said in a weak imitation of FDR. Yes, my friends, according to the impartial Ken- nedy, if George W. Bush is reelected, Social Security and Medicare will be doomed, Jim Crow will return from the political graveyard, and corporations will turn our country into a blackened wasteland from dingy sea to dingy sea.' Also on Tuesday, the Democrats trotted out the most obnoxious little girl they could find - a 12-year- old named liana Wexler, who is wound up, misin- formed, and a dead-on look-alike for Little Orphan Annie. In a speech that for me reinforced the idea that people shouldn't be able to vote until they are 18, Wexler used her ABCs to outline some goals for the greatest nation on Earth and enthusiastically endorsed the idea of a national "No Name Calling Day" where all the candidates are nice to each other. I thought that's what McCain-Feingold was sup- posed to be, but I guess I was wrong. But Annie... I mean... Wexler really got the del- egates going with this: "When our Vice President had a disagreement with the Democratic Senator, he used a really bad word. If I said that word, I would be put in a 'time out.' I think he should be put in a 'time out.'" The brat was referring to a June incident in which Vice President Dick Cheney had finally had enough of the bellicose tactics of Sen. Patrick J. Leahy and told the honorable gentleman from Vermont on the Senate floor to "go [verb] yourself' with the verb in question being the vile F-word. Personally, while I don't condone the use of that word, I thought Cheney's verbiage was used in excel- lent context, and I would have followed it with "...and the donkey you rode in on." It's something I've wanted to tell Leahy for a long time - and Tom Daschle, too, for that matter. But that's just me. What Wexler failed to mention in her lovely, fist- pumping speech was that her hero John F. Kerry used that very same verb late last year in an interview with ROLLING STONE, in which he lamented how President Bush has "[verb]ed up" the war in Iraq. Maybe he should be in a "time out;' too. Moving on now, little John Boy Edwards spoke on Wednesday. There was nothing worth noting. Thursday was the big night. John E Kerry came out and actually accepted the Democratic nomination for president and then went into a long-winded, unin- spiting speech. He touched on the Democrats' favorite line and alluded to President Bush's allegedly lying about weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. "Saying there are weapons of mass destruction in Iraq doesn't make it so" Kerry said. I suppose if he were president, Kerry would ignore American intelligence, British intelligence, Russian intelligence, and the common knowledge of past usage of chemical weapons by a megalomaniac dictator and instead rely on a Ouija board and the United Nations' version of Inspector Clouseau before taking decisive action by bombing an aspirin factory. The Senator criticized the Bush administration's' energy policy saying that the Democrats "value an America that controls its own destiny because it's finally and forever independent of Mideast oil?' But in reality, the Democrats value the life a hand- ful of caribou even more. Kerry also went on a rant about family values saying, "And it is time for those who tall about family values to start valuing families." Well, according to CNN.com, John E Kerry's family is valued quite highly since he is the wealthiest person in the United States Senate with a net worth estimated at $164 million. Forbes magazine values his wife even more and says her net worth is more than $500 million. There you have him, dear readers. The candidate of the middle class and the workingman. Cell phones cause miscommunication I hate cell phones. Maybe I've talked about this before, I'm not sure. You know those commercials where the guy hears wrong and instead of "How are the kids" he thinks she says "Flour the kids"? The kids are standing in the kitchen white from head to toe. I had one of those experiences this week. My mother and I were in town the other day running errands. We were just getting ready to leave the city limits and head for home when Mom's cell phone started ringing. Once I uncovered her purse and tossed through the ruins of gum wrappers and keys and tubes of chapstick, I finally located the phone. It was my Dad. "Hey, Dadoo. What up?" I like to call my dad Dadoo like that. He thinks it's funny. "Have y'all left town yet?" We were cruising past the last 55 mph speed limit sign, which, incidentally, I was obeying. "Nope. What do you need?" I signaled and turned around, heading back m town. "I need you to run by Evans Fertil- izer and pick up a roast broccoli and two elves." "Say what? We're bringing lunch. We don't need broc- coli from Evans. And it's July, Pops." Why would he want elves? "What? Go to Evans and tell them I need a nose bob key life's lessons by carrie helms and a couple of smells?' Nose bob key? Sounded like some new-fangled and seriously painful tool for body piercing. Surely he wasn't having his mid-life crisis now. Dad turned 50 in September. By now it was a little late for that. Any kind of piercing would be in poor taste at this stage of the game. "Dad, I'm all for self-expression and what not, but are you sure?" "What are you talking about, Carrie? Are you okay?" I double-checked the vitals. Pulse, okay. No fever. "Yeah, Dad. I'm cool?" "Huh? I thought you said you were bringing lunch?" "We are." 'q'hen why are you full?" "Cool, Dad. I said I was cool. I'm not sick." "Okay. Can you hear me?" He asked slowly and loudly in case I couldn't, I guess. "Yes, Dad." "Okay. I need a goat lard cheese and tubed bells?' "Say again, Papa Goose. Didn't copy." "Carrie! Go to E/ans. I said I need a hose-barb T and two L's." "A hose-barb T:' 'What's right. Finally!" Ironically enough, once I finally heard him right, it didn't much matter. I still had no idea what in the heck he was talking about. "Forget it. I'm calling Evans. They'll know what I'm talking about. Just go in, and Joe will hand it to you. I'm hanging up the phone now." Apparently a hose-barb T is some kind of t-shaped thing you put on the end of a hose to distribute herbicide. Who would have thought a simple errand could become so complicated? Softball girls exemplify regional values As a tag-along to the state Little League softball tournament for 11- and 12-year-old girls in Waco July 25-28, I'was reminded of some values we often take for granted. The High Plains All-Stars, also called the Twisters, were a bunch of ordinary girls from McLean, Clarendon, Groom, and Hedley. Most were pretty new to softball but had excelled on their town teams and had been selected for the All-Stars. Under coaches Brian Byron, Johnny Haynes, and Daniel Ford, the girls prac- ticed nearly every day in hot weather, riding back and forth from Clarendon to McLean. Working until 10 p.m. some nights on pitching, hitting, and just catch- ing the ball, the girls from four towns got to know each other and became better than they thought they could be. In Dumas, they beat an El Paso team two of three games, surprising themselves by qualifying for the trip to Waco. Friends and family in all the towns also surprised them by donating plenty of money for the trip, which turned out to be almost six days because when they got to Waco, they beat the South Texas team from Willacy County. It was the first win at state for a Panhandle team that anyone could remember. After that, the girls ran into a buzz saw, hometown Waco Midway, whose players had been together for years and which team had won the national title 10 times. It didn't quite seem fair, but after a loss, the Panhandle girls - together for three weeks - gave the Helotes team from San Antonio a good game before bowing out gracefully. The girls who learned to play and win were Ashley Byron, Shed Haynes, Chelsey Sims, Amber Staton and Erin Vassey of McLean; DanieUe Ford, Dominique Mason and Brandi Mays of Clarendon; Maddi Wieberg of Groom; and Jasie Sargent of Hedley. Contributing to the team earlier had been Racheal Hopkins of Groom and Lauren Shelton of Clarendon. The Little League tournament director complimented the fans from High Plains and Helotes for their good behavior, and the umpire said he was impressed by the camaraderie and fair play of our High Plains girls. So I was heartened by the friendships and success molded by these inexperienced girls, something that happens often across our far-flung Panhandle in youth sports, church ministries, and other areas. And I was impressed by the unity that can be achieved by people from across our region when they have a common goal. From girls' softball to churches to city, county, and state government, we should get together more. Each town and each group is one of former President Bush's ,thou- sand points of light;" and when they shine through the dark, we need to let people know. Mike Haynes, Amarillo Garden thieves lack common decency I do not know Mr. George Howard or his family very well. I do know that melons taste sweetest when his come to market and tomatoes begin to actually taste like tomatoes when his redden. So, by inference, I know that like all those who work the land to feed us, the Howards labor long hours and fight many battles to grow the food with which we are blessed. The Howard family and every other person who farms or ranches, put a little bit of themselves into very facet of the complicated task of feeding a nation. I wishI could say I suspect those who stole into Mr. Howard's fields by night to loot his harvest were space aliens, feral pigs, or Arab terrorists; but alas, aliens from outer space and wild swine do not leave tire tracks through the rows of plants, and CNN has not reported any terrorist interest in Texas okra, black-eyed peas, squash, or cucumbers. Therefore I must reluctantly conclude that those stealing Mr. Howard's months of concern, hard work, investment, and high hopes were fellow Texans, folks from right here in Donley County. Folks who watched Mr. Howard plant, water, tend, and nurture his crops before slinking in by night to steal the results of other people's hard work. No use trying to put a good face on it. These people were stealing to sell. If they had needed food to feed a family, it would have been available from a dozen sources, including Mr. Howard himself. Which makes me ashamed for my fellow citizens even if they do not have the decency to be ashamed of themselves. I could almost have more respect for a masked man with a gun as opposed to sneak thieves in the night. Rudyard Kipling once said that the true measure of a civilization is its abil- ity to enforce the unenforceable laws of common decency. Perhaps it is time we all became a bit more concerned about the state of "civilization" here in Donley County. Bill Russell, Clarendon US must st00iy focused in fighting terror Nearly tlee years later, the images, sounds, and emotions are still as clear as the cloudless sky that September morn- ing. It was the wake up call that came too late. September 1 lth opened the world's eyes, and last week the 9-11 Commission opened our minds. After 2.5 million pages of documents and over 1,200 individual interviews, the 9- 11 Commission issued a final report on our security shortcomings before September 11, 2001. No one will dispute that we were unprepared for the terrorist attacks, but the Commission's findings help pinpoint our weaknesses and assert that September 1 lth was a "failure of policy, management, capability and, above all, a failure of imagination:' As the Com- mission reminds us, capitol we are safer today than we were on comment September llth, by stn. kay baiky tchison but we are not safe. Their recommendations provide us the opportunity to re-evaluate our home- land defense three years after the horrific attacks. It is important to remember, however, that over the course of the last three years we've made great strides to secure our people and our nation. We have imple- mented a new policy on terrorism by holding to account terrorist groups and the states that sponsor them. No longer will we allow dangerous threats to gather overseas unchecked. As the 9-11 Commission declared, this is the end of the beginning, Our nation and world are safer today than they were three years ago, but our job is far from over. We will stay the course, we will win the war on terror, and freedom will prevail. This paper's first duty IS that is fit to unbiased by any edRorlal opinion. Any erroneous reflectJ0 standing, or reputation corporation which of 11 l,,mdee rected upon being the Publisher & Editor Web Master I Copy Editor Distribution Clarendon m, ae l Howardwick I Clarendon Hedley On The Mark l pbot Open Display rates ate : inch. Claifled Ads are t words and 12 per word (Boxes or spedal t Thank You Notes are and 12 par word Engagement, wedding' annouocemer ml for ' Net altldel =rod office by Monday be submitted Deadlines may issues. for zip codes inside of county, and $40 Send all addreSS , pO Box 79226-1110. expressed do not neoessadly ref sion of a letter does not of that letter. Letters mar, style, or length. All and must include an number for verlfltlon 1 your chances for space your keep It Ief. No lattert candidates for local submitted to this e The Texas Flt THE BON N,' wRh February 1889; 189 /MIIII, February May 1908; 11 I 1929;