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Clarendon, Texas
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October 9, 2003     The Clarendon Enterprise
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October 9, 2003
 

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I1,,,11,1 ..... IIII ...... I1,,I,1,,I,1,,,11,,I,1,,,11,1,,111,,,I wH E C 00AREN [)()N .|.. .... ;. r rl 1878 - 2003 THE CLARENDON NEWS & THE DONLEY COUNTY LEADER Hedley to host Cotton Festival WEEK begins to take Iraq as we mark Week. Fire Dept. Fire Prevention Bweekend. crowns its Home- bueen for 2003. claim their with a victory over The Enterprise incredible edition/ Council I bonflre Oct. 9 Council of CHS l to invite you to the Bonfire which will October 9, past on Hwy. 70. be lit immediately the JV game against is 6:00 p.m. is invited to come support for the vat- as they enter district Men to hold next week Christian Men's be held on Thurs- at the First United at 7:00 a.m. Campbell will present regarding the college you have adopted a bring them to the invited to Sunday Hudgins, Valley communities reunion on Sunday, 2003, at the Doniey Citizens Center at bread, and drinks Please bring a or dessert to com- Registration starts Club sets reading October meeting of 1911 will be of the Burton October a short but pro- poet, still flush from appearance at Col. Chuckwagon raonth, will present an Program for ladies of lady of discerning a secret or otherwise Cowboy poetry, you attend as a guest of Refreshments will recognize members Lodge #700 A.F. & several long- this coming Sunday, Deyhle, Wayne Boyd J. Robinson as being members for 50 years. In 25- and 40- year be recognized. Worshipful Ferris Grand Master of will confer the is open to Will begin at 2 p.m. The community of Hedley will celebrate its 52nd annual Cotton Festival this Friday and Saturday. The celebration, which is sponsored by the Hedley Lions Club, will begin on Friday with the Hedley Lioness Club's chili and stew supper at the Lioness Hall. The supper will begin at 5:00 p.m., and they will serve chili or stew with cornbread or crackers, dessert, and a drink. Tickets are $5 for adults and $2.50 for children. They will also sell tickets for a queen size hand-made quilt. Wes Thomas and the Saints' Roost Band will perform at 7:00 p.m. Saturday's activities kick off with the Rowe Cemetery Bake Sale at 9:00 a.m. at the Hedley City Hall. All proceeds from the sale go to the cemetery upkeep fund. They will con- tinue to sell goodies until 1:00 p.m. The Tractor Show and Car Show begin at 10 a.m. on Main Street. Parties interested in entering either show can register that morning on Main Street. The National Honor Society at Hedley High School will begin a cakewalk at that same time. The little ones can enjoy train rides around Main Street on Saturday presented by the Borger Lions Club. Street entertainment will be provided by KEFH 99.3 FM throughout the day. Come share a piece of history with your friends and family with Jesse Camacho, star of the hit musical Texas Legacies, who will tell Indian stories as Quanah Parker in his authentic tepees. His assistant Lyn will accompany him. They will also have a variety of handmade Indian articles for sale. The Hedley Senior Citizens will serve cheeseburgers, chips, and drinks while the Hedley High School sophomore class will have Bingo. A special Gift Shop featuring handmade items will also be held in the Senior Citizens Center. They will raffle off a surprise bathroom basket, worth approximately $50, at the Center. Tickets are 50 each or $5.00 for a book of ten. The Lions Club will serve barbecue begin- ning at 11:30 a.m. at the Lions Hall. The bar- becue ticket is good for drawings for a bale of cotton, Moremaker knife, and more. Drawings will be held at 6:00 p.m. at the Lions Hall. You must be present to win. The Kiddie Parade begins at 1:30 p.m. with the Community Parade at 2:00 p.m. The Hedley School Reunion will be held at 3:00 p.m. at the Hedley School. Students, teachers, and anyone associated with the Hedley School are invited to attend the reunion. For more information, contact Anthony Knowles at 856-5246. Turn out the lights Donley County inmates destroy 600 cans of beer originally destined to be the life of a party hosted by students from West Texas A&M Univer- sity. Sheriff Butch Blackburn said the twenty 30-packs destroyed Tues- day were found in the back of one pick-up headed for Lake Greenbelt last month. It is illegal to transport more than one case of beer in a dry county, the sheriff said. Enterprise Digital Photo New water treatment can affect aquariums A new method for treating water coming from the Greenbelt Reservoir is expected to come online next week, and officials with the local water authority are advising aquarium owners to be ready for the change. Beginning Monday, the Green- belt Water Authority will treat water with chloramines - a combination of chlorine and ammonia, which is hess to humans but can be toxic to pet fish. "Aquariums will need carbon filters to remove the ammonia," said Greenbelt General Manger Bobbie Kidd. "That's the only way to get it out." Using chloramines will reduce the level of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), which are not a problem in the local drinking water but were appearing at the far end of Green- belt's distribution network. Greenbelt provides water for municipal and industrial customers between Clarendon and Crowell and serves a population of more than 25,000. Chloramines can also affect people using dialysis equipment, but Kidd said dialysis patients don't need to be concerned about the drinking water. "It's just an issue for the treat- ment equipment," he said. Kidd said that medical facilities in Childress treat a lot of dialysis patients and that those facilities are "more than ready" for the change. Anyone setting up for home dialysis Man drowns after boat capsizes at Greenbelt The drowning of a Hereford man at Lake Greenbelt over the weekend has been ruled an accident, according to Sheriff Butch Blackburn. Ricardo Orta, age 36, was fishing Saturday near Kincaid Park with his brother and nephew when one of the men apparently leaned over too far and capsized their 12-foot johnboat. Fifty-two-year-old Noe Orta of Hereford and 32-year-old Noe Orta, Jr., of Amarillo both managed to swim to shore, but the third man did not make it. The Donley County Sheriff's Office received the call at 2:28 p.m. and dispatched EMS personnel and the Clarendon Volunteer Fire Depart- ment Dive Team. Orta's body was recovered 400 feet from shore at 3: 41 p.m. An autopsy was conducted Monday in Lubbock, which found no signs of foul play and gave the pre- liminary cause of death as accidental drowning. Blackburn said all three men had been drinking, but none'were intoxi- cated. None of the men were wearing life vests. "I think the problem was [Or*a] was wearing lace-up steel-toed boots in 12 feet of water that's full of moss:' Blackburn said. The sheriff commended the CVFD Dive Team for their efforts. "I figured we would be dragging [the lake], but they recovered him quickly," Blackburn said. "That's two people they have recovered for us, and they have done an excellent job." Dive team members participat- ing Saturday were Kyle Hill, Kelly Hill, and Buddy Howard. Clarendon Manufacturing halts production after 30+ years The tools at Clarendon Manu- facturing & Distributing Co. are quiet now, and several local jobs have dis- appeared with the end of production at the facility. General Manger Darrell Leffew said his company had no other option than to stop production on September 25 after more than 30 years in busi- ness. "We had gotten so far behind financially that we couldn't con- tinue;' Leffew said. "We couldn't meet our payroll and our other obli- gations." Clarendon Manufacturing spe- cialized in building elevating scrap- ers; and for the last three years, the company had been producing the S-17E - a 17-yard elevating scraper - for the Scotland-based Terex Equipment Ltd. Leffew said Terex had recently indicated to him that the market was going to have to improve before any more of the scrapers would be ordered. When Clarendon unveiled the prototype of the S-17E in August of 2000, expectations were that the local firm would land a three-year 50- scraper contract with Terex, which could have led to the creation of as many as 70 jobs with all the income being generated from outside of the local economy. "We never got a contract from Terex; we just got purchase orders for two machines at a time" Leffew said. "We built 10 scrapers before we ever made any money." In all, Clarendon built 18 scrap- ers for Terex and had started produc- tion on the three more. "At one time we had 16 people on the payroll, including myself" Leffew said. "We had four lmople on a night shift." Leffew said there are many uncertainties about the future of Clarendon Manufacturing but that this "appears to be the end." He said he has been grateful for the support of the local community. "We feel bad that we couldn't continue," he said. "The CEDC (Clarendon Economic Development Corporation) has supported us, and we feel bad that we couldn't follow through. But that wasn't our plan." The CEDC most recently awarded $20,000 to the firm to help purchase equipment. "We appreciate the support the town and the area have given us," Leffew said. "We appreciate the people who worked here and put forth the effort, and we appreciate our local lending institutions" "We just hope everything ends as well as possible under the circum- stances?' in the future will have their water tested and the appropriate filters put in place. The new treatment method is part of a $2.3 million project at Greenbelt, which is upgrading the chemical feed system, disinfecting system, filtering process, and reporting process. The project began last November and has focused on replacing the old filters, which have been in place for 35 years, and on getting the authority into new more stringent standards set by the federal government. Greenbelt officials also have tried to anticipate any new regulations which might come into effect in the next 20 years. Other changes include doubling the electrical service at the filter plant from 500 KVA to 1,000 KVA and upgrading the computer system in the plant which controls treatment of the water and delivery of the water from the Greenbelt Reservoir from here to Crowell. The present controls were last upgraded 19 years-ago, and some parts date back to 1965. Greenbelt also completed a new storage tank at Childress as part of the upgrade. Work at the filter plant is expected to be finished in November. The new computer system is coming online this week, and Greenbelt per- sonnel will be undergoing training next week to learn to operate the new treatment and filtration system. I1,,,11,1 ..... IIII ...... I1,,I,1,,I,1,,,11,,I,1,,,11,1,,111,,,I wH E C 00AREN [)()N .|.. .... ;. r rl 1878 - 2003 THE CLARENDON NEWS & THE DONLEY COUNTY LEADER Hedley to host Cotton Festival WEEK begins to take Iraq as we mark Week. Fire Dept. Fire Prevention Bweekend. crowns its Home- bueen for 2003. claim their with a victory over The Enterprise incredible edition/ Council I bonflre Oct. 9 Council of CHS l to invite you to the Bonfire which will October 9, past on Hwy. 70. be lit immediately the JV game against is 6:00 p.m. is invited to come support for the vat- as they enter district Men to hold next week Christian Men's be held on Thurs- at the First United at 7:00 a.m. Campbell will present regarding the college you have adopted a bring them to the invited to Sunday Hudgins, Valley communities reunion on Sunday, 2003, at the Doniey Citizens Center at bread, and drinks Please bring a or dessert to com- Registration starts Club sets reading October meeting of 1911 will be of the Burton October a short but pro- poet, still flush from appearance at Col. Chuckwagon raonth, will present an Program for ladies of lady of discerning a secret or otherwise Cowboy poetry, you attend as a guest of Refreshments will recognize members Lodge #700 A.F. & several long- this coming Sunday, Deyhle, Wayne Boyd J. Robinson as being members for 50 years. In 25- and 40- year be recognized. Worshipful Ferris Grand Master of will confer the is open to Will begin at 2 p.m. The community of Hedley will celebrate its 52nd annual Cotton Festival this Friday and Saturday. The celebration, which is sponsored by the Hedley Lions Club, will begin on Friday with the Hedley Lioness Club's chili and stew supper at the Lioness Hall. The supper will begin at 5:00 p.m., and they will serve chili or stew with cornbread or crackers, dessert, and a drink. Tickets are $5 for adults and $2.50 for children. They will also sell tickets for a queen size hand-made quilt. Wes Thomas and the Saints' Roost Band will perform at 7:00 p.m. Saturday's activities kick off with the Rowe Cemetery Bake Sale at 9:00 a.m. at the Hedley City Hall. All proceeds from the sale go to the cemetery upkeep fund. They will con- tinue to sell goodies until 1:00 p.m. The Tractor Show and Car Show begin at 10 a.m. on Main Street. Parties interested in entering either show can register that morning on Main Street. The National Honor Society at Hedley High School will begin a cakewalk at that same time. The little ones can enjoy train rides around Main Street on Saturday presented by the Borger Lions Club. Street entertainment will be provided by KEFH 99.3 FM throughout the day. Come share a piece of history with your friends and family with Jesse Camacho, star of the hit musical Texas Legacies, who will tell Indian stories as Quanah Parker in his authentic tepees. His assistant Lyn will accompany him. They will also have a variety of handmade Indian articles for sale. The Hedley Senior Citizens will serve cheeseburgers, chips, and drinks while the Hedley High School sophomore class will have Bingo. A special Gift Shop featuring handmade items will also be held in the Senior Citizens Center. They will raffle off a surprise bathroom basket, worth approximately $50, at the Center. Tickets are 50 each or $5.00 for a book of ten. The Lions Club will serve barbecue begin- ning at 11:30 a.m. at the Lions Hall. The bar- becue ticket is good for drawings for a bale of cotton, Moremaker knife, and more. Drawings will be held at 6:00 p.m. at the Lions Hall. You must be present to win. The Kiddie Parade begins at 1:30 p.m. with the Community Parade at 2:00 p.m. The Hedley School Reunion will be held at 3:00 p.m. at the Hedley School. Students, teachers, and anyone associated with the Hedley School are invited to attend the reunion. For more information, contact Anthony Knowles at 856-5246. Turn out the lights Donley County inmates destroy 600 cans of beer originally destined to be the life of a party hosted by students from West Texas A&M Univer- sity. Sheriff Butch Blackburn said the twenty 30-packs destroyed Tues- day were found in the back of one pick-up headed for Lake Greenbelt last month. It is illegal to transport more than one case of beer in a dry county, the sheriff said. Enterprise Digital Photo New water treatment can affect aquariums A new method for treating water coming from the Greenbelt Reservoir is expected to come online next week, and officials with the local water authority are advising aquarium owners to be ready for the change. Beginning Monday, the Green- belt Water Authority will treat water with chloramines - a combination of chlorine and ammonia, which is hess to humans but can be toxic to pet fish. "Aquariums will need carbon filters to remove the ammonia," said Greenbelt General Manger Bobbie Kidd. "That's the only way to get it out." Using chloramines will reduce the level of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), which are not a problem in the local drinking water but were appearing at the far end of Green- belt's distribution network. Greenbelt provides water for municipal and industrial customers between Clarendon and Crowell and serves a population of more than 25,000. Chloramines can also affect people using dialysis equipment, but Kidd said dialysis patients don't need to be concerned about the drinking water. "It's just an issue for the treat- ment equipment," he said. Kidd said that medical facilities in Childress treat a lot of dialysis patients and that those facilities are "more than ready" for the change. Anyone setting up for home dialysis Man drowns after boat capsizes at Greenbelt The drowning of a Hereford man at Lake Greenbelt over the weekend has been ruled an accident, according to Sheriff Butch Blackburn. Ricardo Orta, age 36, was fishing Saturday near Kincaid Park with his brother and nephew when one of the men apparently leaned over too far and capsized their 12-foot johnboat. Fifty-two-year-old Noe Orta of Hereford and 32-year-old Noe Orta, Jr., of Amarillo both managed to swim to shore, but the third man did not make it. The Donley County Sheriff's Office received the call at 2:28 p.m. and dispatched EMS personnel and the Clarendon Volunteer Fire Depart- ment Dive Team. Orta's body was recovered 400 feet from shore at 3: 41 p.m. An autopsy was conducted Monday in Lubbock, which found no signs of foul play and gave the pre- liminary cause of death as accidental drowning. Blackburn said all three men had been drinking, but none'were intoxi- cated. None of the men were wearing life vests. "I think the problem was [Or*a] was wearing lace-up steel-toed boots in 12 feet of water that's full of moss:' Blackburn said. The sheriff commended the CVFD Dive Team for their efforts. "I figured we would be dragging [the lake], but they recovered him quickly," Blackburn said. "That's two people they have recovered for us, and they have done an excellent job." Dive team members participat- ing Saturday were Kyle Hill, Kelly Hill, and Buddy Howard. Clarendon Manufacturing halts production after 30+ years The tools at Clarendon Manu- facturing & Distributing Co. are quiet now, and several local jobs have dis- appeared with the end of production at the facility. General Manger Darrell Leffew said his company had no other option than to stop production on September 25 after more than 30 years in busi- ness. "We had gotten so far behind financially that we couldn't con- tinue;' Leffew said. "We couldn't meet our payroll and our other obli- gations." Clarendon Manufacturing spe- cialized in building elevating scrap- ers; and for the last three years, the company had been producing the S-17E - a 17-yard elevating scraper - for the Scotland-based Terex Equipment Ltd. Leffew said Terex had recently indicated to him that the market was going to have to improve before any more of the scrapers would be ordered. When Clarendon unveiled the prototype of the S-17E in August of 2000, expectations were that the local firm would land a three-year 50- scraper contract with Terex, which could have led to the creation of as many as 70 jobs with all the income being generated from outside of the local economy. "We never got a contract from Terex; we just got purchase orders for two machines at a time" Leffew said. "We built 10 scrapers before we ever made any money." In all, Clarendon built 18 scrap- ers for Terex and had started produc- tion on the three more. "At one time we had 16 people on the payroll, including myself" Leffew said. "We had four lmople on a night shift." Leffew said there are many uncertainties about the future of Clarendon Manufacturing but that this "appears to be the end." He said he has been grateful for the support of the local community. "We feel bad that we couldn't continue," he said. "The CEDC (Clarendon Economic Development Corporation) has supported us, and we feel bad that we couldn't follow through. But that wasn't our plan." The CEDC most recently awarded $20,000 to the firm to help purchase equipment. "We appreciate the support the town and the area have given us," Leffew said. "We appreciate the people who worked here and put forth the effort, and we appreciate our local lending institutions" "We just hope everything ends as well as possible under the circum- stances?' in the future will have their water tested and the appropriate filters put in place. The new treatment method is part of a $2.3 million project at Greenbelt, which is upgrading the chemical feed system, disinfecting system, filtering process, and reporting process. The project began last November and has focused on replacing the old filters, which have been in place for 35 years, and on getting the authority into new more stringent standards set by the federal government. Greenbelt officials also have tried to anticipate any new regulations which might come into effect in the next 20 years. Other changes include doubling the electrical service at the filter plant from 500 KVA to 1,000 KVA and upgrading the computer system in the plant which controls treatment of the water and delivery of the water from the Greenbelt Reservoir from here to Crowell. The present controls were last upgraded 19 years-ago, and some parts date back to 1965. Greenbelt also completed a new storage tank at Childress as part of the upgrade. Work at the filter plant is expected to be finished in November. The new computer system is coming online this week, and Greenbelt per- sonnel will be undergoing training next week to learn to operate the new treatment and filtration system.