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Clarendon, Texas
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October 9, 2003     The Clarendon Enterprise
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iiii! iiiiii iii %  !+ i i   ........... 2 :rlii i{%4+.)N TtefldoflEnterlse October9,2003 WARNING: The following column is an editorial (i.e. sn opln|on, a point of lw) ,d may contain ideas with which some readers may f,lNdy dhlagree, it could be harmful to {iberals socialists, and other smell mammals. Reed at your own dsk. Newspapers record history, protect liberty Although America's soldiers face danger every day. major combat is over in Iraq. Leaders in that country are now trying to hammer out what form their new government will take; and meanwhile, freedom appears to be taking root among the Iraqi people. News reports have revealed . that iraqis are enjoying new benefits of a free market. Satel- lite television receiver sales are brisk, cellular phone service is on the way, and schools are reopening without the omnipres- ent influence of Saddam. editor's Things are by no means per- feet in lraq, but they are getting c0mmeff better. Even Democratic con- by  nck- gressmen who have gone there are admitting this. Last week, FoxNews.com reported another hall- mark of liberty has emerged in Iraq - a free press. During Saddam's brutal regime, there were only five newspapers; and all reported just what Hussein and his cronies wanted them to. There was no opposi- lion. Today, approximately 160 newspapers arc being published in lraq. "The lraqis are very eager to read aud expm themselves," said printer Slab Hassan. i Reading. Becoming informed. Exng epil+ ion. Each of these is good, and each is sary I representative form of government to world. This week is National Newspaper Week, mad Americans are fortunate to have the benefits of a press protected by the highest law in the - the United States Constitution. Newspapers+ hers, : and printers were instrumental in the fomllttonof ar Republic; and for more than 200 years, rs have flourished in America. ii!g(  i Literally thousands of newspapers slled every week in this country. Texas alone 191 daily i! newspapers and 440 weekly and semi- news- papers. ': Newspapers have recorded every major historic event from Washington's crossing of the llaware to the War Between the States to Pearl Harbor to tember I l, 2001. Along the way, papers  rord millions of birth announcements, wedding sliillali and obituaries. They have covered eoun , public meetings, and political wrangles. As civilization pushed its way into the areas of the American continent, newspapers among the first institutions to arrive and enc others to follow. Such was the case when this nvs- paper was founded as Tim CLARmVOON NEWS  ill 1878. For more than 125 years, our paper has coved the ups and downs of Clarendon and Donly Couitly, It was there when "Saints' Roost" was founded, aadR was there when the community had to painfully pull up stakes and move to the new railroad. The news- paper was there for the establishment of Clarend College, the construction of every new public building, and every good and progressive thing that this city has enjoyed. The newspaper has also been there when the wrath of nature struck our county in the form of heat, high winds, hail, deadly tornadoes, more than one flood, and even a few small earthquakes. It was there when fire destroyed several downtown esses there when the fire department was erea. It was 1 there when the depot was built, and it was there wheal ' the depot was moved. The newspaper was there when a heinous murder was committed and there when the killer's own life was taken by the state. Whether the athletes were in a winless season or headed to state or national playoffs, the newspaper has been there to cover the Bronchos, the Bulldogs, and the Owls. The vewspaper is more than just anothea" lsi- + hess - although in this case, it is the oldest s in town. The newspaper is an institution in its own fight. It fills a present need for the reader and the advertiser, and it serves as a weekly time capsule to tell future generations about the way we live and who we are. It communicates our hopes and dreams and our victories and our setbacks. Whether you made the honor roll, scored a down, or just wrote a letter to Santa, odds arey,ve been in the paper. The newspaper records your i your education, your marriage, and ultimaly death. The newspaper has an obligation to report t i facts in its news stories, and it also serves as a forum of ideas on its opinion page. Those opinions may sometimes be diametrically opposed, but being tble to express them is what freedom means. : Readers may not always like what the editor Or .... the letter writer has to say, but that's okay. B to express yourself is not about being ; it's i exercising our God-given freedoms. It's about havitl| a say in how our government serves us, and it's about holding our elected representatives - from City Hall: to Capitol Hill - accountable. , : 4 The survival of Liberty - in   title--.{: { ! where - is forever linked to a free prm,.@ , igi letter to the editor referred to this  embodiment of a free society," and so it is.  it has  been, and so may it ever he. Professor's message causes car wre('k I learned a very important lesson this week: cell phones and driving are bad. I am not a very good driver. I will be the first to admit it. I'm not ashamed. I have never liked driving. It makes me ner- vous, and I don't like being that stressed out. I also have a history of being unable to walk and chew gum. I cannot clap and sing. Contrary to popular belief, I do not I slammed the brake and slowed down enough that when I hit the car in front of me, it was a very gentle "love pat." Maybe it was a little harder than that. The guy pulled over into a parking lot life's lessons by carrie helms Here I was talking on a brand new cell phone in a relatively new car. I had just come from an important meeting so I was all dressed up. He thought I was some spoiled little rich girl whose Daddy was going to take care of bribing judges and officials to keep me from getting in trouble. How much further from the truth can you get! think the ability to multi-task is gender related. So I have been genetically set up for a fall. I was driving back to campus the other day, and I looked at my cell phone and saw I had a missed call. I didn't recognize the number, but it had the prefix for a number on campus. Normally, I would have tossed the phone hack in my bag and checked it later, but I was waiting for an important call from a boy. I listened to the message. It was from one of my professors. I didn't hear the whole thing, but I picked up that some paper of mine was missing or something. I was trying to re-play the message when the girl riding with me cursed and told me to stop! Red light! just to the side of the "scene" and got out. I was very nervous, and I laid my head on the steering wheel for a minute to regroup. Do I tell him I was on the phone? Where's my insurance card? Are we going to call the police? Am I going to jail? What do I say? He was looking over his car that obvi- ously was not damaged in any way. I apol- ogized as sincerely as I could and asked if he thought everything was okay. He was bitter because he had just gotten his car back after an accident he had a few months earlier that wasn't his fault either. He said I needed to realize I wasn't the only person in the world and I should be concerned with someone besides myself. It was then that I realized what he must be thinking. It was obvious that the accident was less than a fender bender. I would hardly even call it a scrape. The guy didn't want to look like a jerk, so he said he didn't have time to get a police report, he had better things to do, but he would be in touch later. The girl who was riding with me is 19 years old and doesn't have a driver's license. "Why is it they let you have a driv- er's license, and they won't give me one?" All of this stressed me out beyond my normal limits. I mean, this is a feeling worse than the security alarm going off in the computer lab. I called my mom, and then I went back to my room and cried. There was a message on my dorm phone, too. The pro- fessor found my paper. Oops. She had it all along. She was sorry she bothered me. The l,leWSl00per: l00im Talki.g I was pretty sorry myself. Free trade pacts make America richer What do Chile and Singapore have in common? The first nation is in South America; the second is halfway around the globe in Asia. Chileans speak Spanish; the language of Singapore is Mandarin. Fifteen million people live in Chile while Singapore has only four million. Until recently these countries shared tittle. But this summer they became the most recent countries to engage in free trade agree- ments with the United States, an exclusive group of nations destined for economic prosperity. The agreements were the first to he signed under the Trade Promotion Author- ity (TPA) enacted by Congress last year. TPA gives the president the ability to nego- tiate trade agreements Congress can accept or ject, but not modify. Unfortunately, TPA lapsed in 1994 and was not renewed. As a result, trade negotiation has remained stagnant for nearly a decade. While other nations built partnerships, America largely i'Sat on the sidelines as an observer. Foreign [gOvernments did not want to waste effort crafting a complex and far-reaching agree- merit, only to see it altered in the initial stages. Our economy - and our workers -suffered. i  The Chile and Singapore agreements signaled an end to that era. This trade leg- islation was an important step to promote economic growth, bring lower prices to comuraers, and create jobs in America. Trade is essential to our current and future prosperity. Texas exports everything from computer and electronic products to rice. The absence of favorable trade agree- ments imposes an invisible tax that Ameri- cans pay every time we shop, whether we buy tennis shoes or tractors. Economists predict that reducing tariffs by one-third would boost the U.S. economy by $177 billion each year. That's an average savings of $2,500 a year for a family of four. Trade jobs are high paying jobs. One in 10 Americans works in industries ;that depend on the export of goods and ! SerVices. Accounting for more than one . of  u.s. econ,nic growth in ii, export jobs pay wages approxi- mately 13 to 18 percent higher than the national average. Clearly, opening markets for American businesses creates employ- -t+ ahm+ I 1+ And export oppor- tunities are not only beneficial for large companies. Small business is the backbone of our capitol nation's economy, creating three out of comment every four jobs and by sen. kay baily hutchn producing one-half of the U.S. gross domestic product. To stay at the forefront of innovation, small busi- nesses need access to global markets and a level playing field. Free and fair trade pro- vides that and more. It also creates opportunities for farm- ers and ranchers - especially important for Texas, the nation's third largest agriculture exporting state. Texas' number one agricul- tural export is live animals and red meats, totaling more than $800 million annu- ally. As the nation's number one cotton exporter, Texas exported 1.5 million bales in a single year to Mexico alone. And when it comes to feed grains and products, Texas ranks seventh. One in three U.S. farmers plants for exports, and they will ship an estimated $54.5 billion overseas in agri- cultural products and crops this year. That means more jobs here at home and grow- ing markets for oar products. Our global standing is increasingly Eiffer 126th Year, Series 3, Vol. xIV, N/dl ISSN 1088-9698) is by Roger A. Estlack at Clarendon, Toms postage paid at Clarendon, T Copyright 2003. All r This paper's first duty IS tO that Is fit to print, honet I unlued byany Any errOneous :mnalng, or reputeUon of geJi ootporatlon which may of 1 lmmam rectal upon being brougllt tO the nnagement. Publisher & Editor [ Copy Editor [ Distribution [ C=naon I n, auy l Clarendon Spo,. I sand# Hedley Spore Outdoor Spore Phone Fax E-Mail 7 i A Tml :7 ] i/i I N W The Texas Tnt ON NEws with which have merged: 11 Febctmry 1889; 11 1991; lm Ilmmw-Stmdm,  AIIIIMoe, Felxmmy 1899; May 19o8; 11 1929; Clmlmda Introd., March II4A WL k'mp R mef. No latte wl for local submlttsd to this newslP er erty of 11m Ibeterwhm and Letters to the editor are alW ex in latters are t' or staff of 11 elfzl sion of s letter does not I of that letter. Letters may be +mar, style, or len and must include an for zip codes InsMe , and $40 in )Sen all ado'tess changes to: Ibeqd, PO Box 111, O, 79226-1110. Open Olsp;ay rates are $4 Inch. Classified Ads words and 12 per word for word (Boxes or special Thank You Notes are and 19 per word for eeCl Engagement, wedding announcements sre $10 mired for publication within ten days after publlC reliant on the economy of the Western Hemisphere, and political stability is largely dependent on economic factors as well. Unfortunately, the slowdown in the U.S. has trickled down throughout Central and South America, threatening fledgling democracies. Building and establishing trade relationships with our neighbors is critical. If our Hemisphere is economically viable, everybody wins. The North American Free Trade number for verification Agreement, NAFTA, opened the doors for  free and fair trade in the  :  letter, our hemisphere. In fact, of the 233 desti- nations for Texas exports, more than half go to Canada and Mexico as a result of NAFTA. The agreement with Chile is our first with a South American country, but certainly not the last. Free and fair trade agreements with Australia, the Dominican Republic, Bah- rain, Morocco and a number of nations in Central and South America, as well as in : Southern Africa, are in the works. Soon, doors will be open a little wider on all the t earth's continents, helping to expand for- , eign markets and strengthen our nation's economy. By extending our global reach, we will ! share the fruits of democracy and continue to be the beacon of freedom for the world. , And our country and our people will he richer for it. !, office by Monday st noon. Deadlines ma Issues. Idfi's Lessons On The Mark I iiii! iiiiii iii %  !+ i i   ........... 2 :rlii i{%4+.)N TtefldoflEnterlse October9,2003 WARNING: The following column is an editorial (i.e. sn opln|on, a point of lw) ,d may contain ideas with which some readers may f,lNdy dhlagree, it could be harmful to {iberals socialists, and other smell mammals. Reed at your own dsk. Newspapers record history, protect liberty Although America's soldiers face danger every day. major combat is over in Iraq. Leaders in that country are now trying to hammer out what form their new government will take; and meanwhile, freedom appears to be taking root among the Iraqi people. News reports have revealed . that iraqis are enjoying new benefits of a free market. Satel- lite television receiver sales are brisk, cellular phone service is on the way, and schools are reopening without the omnipres- ent influence of Saddam. editor's Things are by no means per- feet in lraq, but they are getting c0mmeff better. Even Democratic con- by  nck- gressmen who have gone there are admitting this. Last week, FoxNews.com reported another hall- mark of liberty has emerged in Iraq - a free press. During Saddam's brutal regime, there were only five newspapers; and all reported just what Hussein and his cronies wanted them to. There was no opposi- lion. Today, approximately 160 newspapers arc being published in lraq. "The lraqis are very eager to read aud expm themselves," said printer Slab Hassan. i Reading. Becoming informed. Exng epil+ ion. Each of these is good, and each is sary I representative form of government to world. This week is National Newspaper Week, mad Americans are fortunate to have the benefits of a press protected by the highest law in the - the United States Constitution. Newspapers+ hers, : and printers were instrumental in the fomllttonof ar Republic; and for more than 200 years, rs have flourished in America. ii!g(  i Literally thousands of newspapers slled every week in this country. Texas alone 191 daily i! newspapers and 440 weekly and semi- news- papers. ': Newspapers have recorded every major historic event from Washington's crossing of the llaware to the War Between the States to Pearl Harbor to tember I l, 2001. Along the way, papers  rord millions of birth announcements, wedding sliillali and obituaries. They have covered eoun , public meetings, and political wrangles. As civilization pushed its way into the areas of the American continent, newspapers among the first institutions to arrive and enc others to follow. Such was the case when this nvs- paper was founded as Tim CLARmVOON NEWS  ill 1878. For more than 125 years, our paper has coved the ups and downs of Clarendon and Donly Couitly, It was there when "Saints' Roost" was founded, aadR was there when the community had to painfully pull up stakes and move to the new railroad. The news- paper was there for the establishment of Clarend College, the construction of every new public building, and every good and progressive thing that this city has enjoyed. The newspaper has also been there when the wrath of nature struck our county in the form of heat, high winds, hail, deadly tornadoes, more than one flood, and even a few small earthquakes. It was there when fire destroyed several downtown esses there when the fire department was erea. It was 1 there when the depot was built, and it was there wheal ' the depot was moved. The newspaper was there when a heinous murder was committed and there when the killer's own life was taken by the state. Whether the athletes were in a winless season or headed to state or national playoffs, the newspaper has been there to cover the Bronchos, the Bulldogs, and the Owls. The vewspaper is more than just anothea" lsi- + hess - although in this case, it is the oldest s in town. The newspaper is an institution in its own fight. It fills a present need for the reader and the advertiser, and it serves as a weekly time capsule to tell future generations about the way we live and who we are. It communicates our hopes and dreams and our victories and our setbacks. Whether you made the honor roll, scored a down, or just wrote a letter to Santa, odds arey,ve been in the paper. The newspaper records your i your education, your marriage, and ultimaly death. The newspaper has an obligation to report t i facts in its news stories, and it also serves as a forum of ideas on its opinion page. Those opinions may sometimes be diametrically opposed, but being tble to express them is what freedom means. : Readers may not always like what the editor Or .... the letter writer has to say, but that's okay. B to express yourself is not about being ; it's i exercising our God-given freedoms. It's about havitl| a say in how our government serves us, and it's about holding our elected representatives - from City Hall: to Capitol Hill - accountable. , : 4 The survival of Liberty - in   title--.{: { ! where - is forever linked to a free prm,.@ , igi letter to the editor referred to this  embodiment of a free society," and so it is.  it has  been, and so may it ever he. Professor's message causes car wre('k I learned a very important lesson this week: cell phones and driving are bad. I am not a very good driver. I will be the first to admit it. I'm not ashamed. I have never liked driving. It makes me ner- vous, and I don't like being that stressed out. I also have a history of being unable to walk and chew gum. I cannot clap and sing. Contrary to popular belief, I do not I slammed the brake and slowed down enough that when I hit the car in front of me, it was a very gentle "love pat." Maybe it was a little harder than that. The guy pulled over into a parking lot life's lessons by carrie helms Here I was talking on a brand new cell phone in a relatively new car. I had just come from an important meeting so I was all dressed up. He thought I was some spoiled little rich girl whose Daddy was going to take care of bribing judges and officials to keep me from getting in trouble. How much further from the truth can you get! think the ability to multi-task is gender related. So I have been genetically set up for a fall. I was driving back to campus the other day, and I looked at my cell phone and saw I had a missed call. I didn't recognize the number, but it had the prefix for a number on campus. Normally, I would have tossed the phone hack in my bag and checked it later, but I was waiting for an important call from a boy. I listened to the message. It was from one of my professors. I didn't hear the whole thing, but I picked up that some paper of mine was missing or something. I was trying to re-play the message when the girl riding with me cursed and told me to stop! Red light! just to the side of the "scene" and got out. I was very nervous, and I laid my head on the steering wheel for a minute to regroup. Do I tell him I was on the phone? Where's my insurance card? Are we going to call the police? Am I going to jail? What do I say? He was looking over his car that obvi- ously was not damaged in any way. I apol- ogized as sincerely as I could and asked if he thought everything was okay. He was bitter because he had just gotten his car back after an accident he had a few months earlier that wasn't his fault either. He said I needed to realize I wasn't the only person in the world and I should be concerned with someone besides myself. It was then that I realized what he must be thinking. It was obvious that the accident was less than a fender bender. I would hardly even call it a scrape. The guy didn't want to look like a jerk, so he said he didn't have time to get a police report, he had better things to do, but he would be in touch later. The girl who was riding with me is 19 years old and doesn't have a driver's license. "Why is it they let you have a driv- er's license, and they won't give me one?" All of this stressed me out beyond my normal limits. I mean, this is a feeling worse than the security alarm going off in the computer lab. I called my mom, and then I went back to my room and cried. There was a message on my dorm phone, too. The pro- fessor found my paper. Oops. She had it all along. She was sorry she bothered me. The l,leWSl00per: l00im Talki.g I was pretty sorry myself. Free trade pacts make America richer What do Chile and Singapore have in common? The first nation is in South America; the second is halfway around the globe in Asia. Chileans speak Spanish; the language of Singapore is Mandarin. Fifteen million people live in Chile while Singapore has only four million. Until recently these countries shared tittle. But this summer they became the most recent countries to engage in free trade agree- ments with the United States, an exclusive group of nations destined for economic prosperity. The agreements were the first to he signed under the Trade Promotion Author- ity (TPA) enacted by Congress last year. TPA gives the president the ability to nego- tiate trade agreements Congress can accept or ject, but not modify. Unfortunately, TPA lapsed in 1994 and was not renewed. As a result, trade negotiation has remained stagnant for nearly a decade. While other nations built partnerships, America largely i'Sat on the sidelines as an observer. Foreign [gOvernments did not want to waste effort crafting a complex and far-reaching agree- merit, only to see it altered in the initial stages. Our economy - and our workers -suffered. i  The Chile and Singapore agreements signaled an end to that era. This trade leg- islation was an important step to promote economic growth, bring lower prices to comuraers, and create jobs in America. Trade is essential to our current and future prosperity. Texas exports everything from computer and electronic products to rice. The absence of favorable trade agree- ments imposes an invisible tax that Ameri- cans pay every time we shop, whether we buy tennis shoes or tractors. Economists predict that reducing tariffs by one-third would boost the U.S. economy by $177 billion each year. That's an average savings of $2,500 a year for a family of four. Trade jobs are high paying jobs. One in 10 Americans works in industries ;that depend on the export of goods and ! SerVices. Accounting for more than one . of  u.s. econ,nic growth in ii, export jobs pay wages approxi- mately 13 to 18 percent higher than the national average. Clearly, opening markets for American businesses creates employ- -t+ ahm+ I 1+ And export oppor- tunities are not only beneficial for large companies. Small business is the backbone of our capitol nation's economy, creating three out of comment every four jobs and by sen. kay baily hutchn producing one-half of the U.S. gross domestic product. To stay at the forefront of innovation, small busi- nesses need access to global markets and a level playing field. Free and fair trade pro- vides that and more. It also creates opportunities for farm- ers and ranchers - especially important for Texas, the nation's third largest agriculture exporting state. Texas' number one agricul- tural export is live animals and red meats, totaling more than $800 million annu- ally. As the nation's number one cotton exporter, Texas exported 1.5 million bales in a single year to Mexico alone. And when it comes to feed grains and products, Texas ranks seventh. One in three U.S. farmers plants for exports, and they will ship an estimated $54.5 billion overseas in agri- cultural products and crops this year. That means more jobs here at home and grow- ing markets for oar products. Our global standing is increasingly Eiffer 126th Year, Series 3, Vol. xIV, N/dl ISSN 1088-9698) is by Roger A. Estlack at Clarendon, Toms postage paid at Clarendon, T Copyright 2003. All r This paper's first duty IS tO that Is fit to print, honet I unlued byany Any errOneous :mnalng, or reputeUon of geJi ootporatlon which may of 1 lmmam rectal upon being brougllt tO the nnagement. Publisher & Editor [ Copy Editor [ Distribution [ C=naon I n, auy l Clarendon Spo,. I sand# Hedley Spore Outdoor Spore Phone Fax E-Mail 7 i A Tml :7 ] i/i I N W The Texas Tnt ON NEws with which have merged: 11 Febctmry 1889; 11 1991; lm Ilmmw-Stmdm,  AIIIIMoe, Felxmmy 1899; May 19o8; 11 1929; Clmlmda Introd., March II4A WL k'mp R mef. No latte wl for local submlttsd to this newslP er erty of 11m Ibeterwhm and Letters to the editor are alW ex in latters are t' or staff of 11 elfzl sion of s letter does not I of that letter. Letters may be +mar, style, or len and must include an for zip codes InsMe , and $40 in )Sen all ado'tess changes to: Ibeqd, PO Box 111, O, 79226-1110. Open Olsp;ay rates are $4 Inch. Classified Ads words and 12 per word for word (Boxes or special Thank You Notes are and 19 per word for eeCl Engagement, wedding announcements sre $10 mired for publication within ten days after publlC reliant on the economy of the Western Hemisphere, and political stability is largely dependent on economic factors as well. Unfortunately, the slowdown in the U.S. has trickled down throughout Central and South America, threatening fledgling democracies. Building and establishing trade relationships with our neighbors is critical. If our Hemisphere is economically viable, everybody wins. The North American Free Trade number for verification Agreement, NAFTA, opened the doors for  free and fair trade in the  :  letter, our hemisphere. In fact, of the 233 desti- nations for Texas exports, more than half go to Canada and Mexico as a result of NAFTA. The agreement with Chile is our first with a South American country, but certainly not the last. Free and fair trade agreements with Australia, the Dominican Republic, Bah- rain, Morocco and a number of nations in Central and South America, as well as in : Southern Africa, are in the works. Soon, doors will be open a little wider on all the t earth's continents, helping to expand for- , eign markets and strengthen our nation's economy. By extending our global reach, we will ! share the fruits of democracy and continue to be the beacon of freedom for the world. , And our country and our people will he richer for it. !, office by Monday st noon. Deadlines ma Issues. Idfi's Lessons On The Mark I