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November 4, 2004     The Clarendon Enterprise
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2 ii!  :' !" + -:++ " i+ E ''  + %    :% S  The Clarendon Enterprise November 4, 2004 WARNING: The following column is an editorial (i.e, an opinion, a point of view) and may contain ideas with which some readers may freely disagree. It could be harmful to liberals, socialists, and other small mammals. Read at your own risk. City Hall vital to downtown revitalization As noted by this week's page-one story, the Clarendon City Hall is in bad shape. Poor maintenance is allowing water to leak inside the building, causing damage that may be expensive to repair. The story sounds depress- ....... ingly familiar. Just a few years ago, the Donley County Court- house was in such a sad state that it took a state grant and just shy of a million dollars in local tax money to bring it back up to standard, editor's City Hall doesn't appear to be in as bad a shape as the court- commentary house then was - at least I don't by roger estlack know of any bat infestation, but city leaders need to act now to keep further damage from being done and ultimately to save the building for future generations. The municipal building was constructed in 1918 with substantial financial assistance by local philanthropist and JA Ranch owner Cornelia Adair, who eight years earlier had built the Adair Hospital. Originally built as a YMCA, City Hall has undergone numerous renovations as needs changed, all the while serving the people of Clarendon in various ways. But for quite some time, the municipal building has been slowly becoming a downtown eyesore. While it retains a certain stately look with its ionic columns and wide front steps, peeling paint and boarded up windows make it look nearly abandoned at first glance. Unlike the pre-restored courthouse, the condition of city offices inside is quite different from the build- ing's outward appearance. Relatively new carpet, fur- niture, and paint give the first floor interior a definitely modem, well-maintained look of which our citizens can be proud. City officials are on the right track as they are currently identifying the problems facing the building and trying to determine what it will take to fix them. Collecting that information will be critical to making a wise, financially sound decision regarding the build- ing's future. As a regular observer of city meetings, I can attest that cit officials have on a few occasions kicked around  id 'Jng the seat of city government to a new location. That ide may have its gTmd points, but Aldermen should resist any urges to abandon the 1918 structure. City Hall has been a local landmark for many years, and it is an important element that helps make up our central business district. Additionally, the municipal building provides valuable workspace, rec- reation areas, and training rooms for the Clarendon Volunteer Fire Department. Moving the city offices would not be a quick fix for the problem since the fire department would still need the building. More importantly, abandoning the current City Hall would instantly create another large, unused or under-used building downtown. City leaders constantly urge Clarendon citizens to fix up and clean up around town. It is incumbent upon them to now put their money where their mouths are. What action the Board of Aldermen ultimately takes regarding City Hall will say a lot about our elected leaders' commitment to improving our community, to revitalizing our downtown, and to being good caretak- ers of our city's assets. We're not looking for a project on the same scale as the courthouse restoration, but fixing up City Hall - making it weather tight and attractive - must be a priority for anyone who hopes to see Clarendon move forward toward a better tomorrow. HoIefully, that statement is something all citizens can agree with as the aldermen begin to look at their options. Meanwhile... Last week's sports headline, "Visiting Indians stomp Broncos at home, 46-19," was entirely accurate, but it seems some folks would have preferred it to read "Broncos edged out by Quanah" or better yet "Bron- cos look forward to next week." Give me a break. The complaints remind me of a couple of years ago when the state-ranked Hedley girls hosted the Clarendon girls in Owl Gym and gave the visitors a basketball lesson. The headline said, "Lady Owls trounce Lady Broncos, 86-44." A 42-point loss sounds like a trouncing to me, bvt some Clarendon parents were upset. I guess we hurt their babies' self esteem - or maybe it was really just the parents' self esteem. The bottom line is this: If Clarendon kids can't handle a truthful headline about a sports game, then they're in for a lot of bigger disappointments in life. Besides, it'll all even out when the o1' Broncos "stomp" or "trounce" somebody else.., just like last Friday night. This paper has always supported the Broncos, but there is no need to sugar-coat the facts for them. I believe our student athletes are a resilient bunch who aren't substantially deterred by headlines.., no matter how they are worded. And finally, if any reader has any trouble about a headline, don't go complaining to the sports writers. They don't write the headlines; I do. Their jobs are hard enough without somebody nitpicking the head- line that gets put on the stories. Power of print produces hairless legs Happy November! By the time this goes m print we will have elected or re- elected a President of the United States of America. I guess I missed my window of opportunity to make fun of the candidates. Now that window is closed, and anything I said would be both rude and irrelevant, November is more than just a month for election days and Thanksgiving and Veterans Day. November on the fourth floor of Blanche Lange Hall is very spe- cial. It's No-Shave November. The rules are very simple. All con- testants will stop shaving their legs on Wednesday, November 3, 2004, at 10 p.m. following a brief informational meeting and sign-up time. Contestants will refrain from shaving until Friday, December 3, 2004, at 10 p.m., when we meet again to declare a winner. The girl who goes the longest without shaving and/or is the most disgusting will win a cash prize and the world's coolest razor. I got the idea from my boss, the dorm director. She was in high school in the 60s, and she and her girlfriends decided that they would hold No-Shave November as a protest. They didn't get too many other girls to sign on, but it was a real bonding experience between them. The girls of the fourth floor are not protesting anything. This is not a political movement. We are not making a state- life's lessons by carrie helms ment. I just want to see that kind of bond- ing between my residents. What is the one thing that unites all American women? We all hate shaving our legs, but we do it on an almost daily basis. America is one of the only nations in the world that requires its women tobe hair- less in order to be sexy. The custom of removing hair from one's legs dates back to the 400s B.C. when Greek women were singeing the hair from their legs with lamps. The custom died out for inexplicable reasons. It was only in May of 1915 that the custom was revived on this continent. It all began with that month's edition of Harper's Bazaar. The magazine featured a model sporting a sleeveless evening gown that exposed, for the first time in fashion, her bare shoulders and her armpits. A young marketing executive with the Wilkinson Sword Company that made razor blades for men, designed a campaign to convince the women of North America that underarm hair was unhygienic and anti-feminine. And it worked! In two years, the sales of razor blades doubled, and almost one hundred years later, women still shave their legs and underarms. That's the power of the print media! If I started a campaign to convince the world that alarm clocks caused brain damage by waking you so rapidly from REM sleep, I could single-handedly bring down the alarm clock industry and have the 8 a.m. class tradition destroyed. Maybe No-Shave November is a movement after all. It is not a call for women to shake off patriarchal oppression, but a call for more responsible advertising and journalism. With great power, comes great respon- sibility. As a journalist I must use my powers for good, not evil. Please join us in No-Shave November, and together we can take over the world for truth, honesty, and an alarm-clock free existence. Veterans Day a time tol;ecall sacrifices From the brave last stand at the Alamo in 1836, to rugged Monte Casino during World War II, to the desert sands of lraq, Texans have earned a reputation for not backing down in the fight for freedom even when it may cost them their lives. It is to honor these brave soldiers that we celebrate Veterans' Day and take time to remember so much given on our behalf. Texas has our nation's third-largest veteran community, according to the 2000 census. Over 1.7 million of our 26.5 mil- lion veterans live in the Lone Star state. Texas is also home to a large number of defense facilities, with over 114,000 military personnel stationed in our bases. Texans serve around the globe, on land, sea, and air, defending this nation and all who value freedom. As we pay our respects this Veterans' Day, I hope we will also pause to show them our gratitude as well. I try to express my thanks to our vet- erans by doing my part in Congress, where I serve on the Veterans Affairs Committee. There I have worked with my colleagues to ensure we provide our veterans the best possible resources and care. In recent years, we've passed a range of legislation that addressed the needs of our veteran community: the Veterans' Opportunities Act, which created new life insurance and health care benefits for up to two million eligible spouses and chil- dren of veterans; the Homeless Veterans Comprehensive Assistance Act that authorized $1 bil- !!i capitol comment by sen. kay bailey hutchison lion to aid homeless veterans and prevent others from becoming homeless; and the Veterans Education and Benefits Expansion Act, which authorized more than $3.1 bil- lion over five years to expand educational, housing, burial, and disability benefits. Earlier we introduced legislation to assist Medicare-eligible veterans struggling with the costs of prescription medications. And we have continued to pass strong Defense and Military Construction appro- priations bills to ensure our troops are fully equipped to face the enemy. Fighting in distant lands can be lonely and trying for troops who miss home. Yet every day we see more evidence of a "can do" spirit and Texas ingenuity to help bridge the gap between our troops and their loved ones. If anyone wants to talk about family values, they should look at our men and women in uniform. And speaking of values, it is good to know that the courage that burned in the soldiers of the Alamo still shines brightly. Sgt. Pamela Osboume used to call her husband Rohan almost every day from her supply depot in Baghdad. Her last conversation with her husband is poignant. "Hold your head up, baby," she said. "I'm coming home. Even if I come home in a box, you should know that I did it for you. Take care of the kids. Stay strong. And remember that I love you." Unfortunately, she and a fellow soldier were killed the next day. Sgt. Osbourne joined the ranks of those veterans who have died so we may remain free. An immigrant who came to our country at age 14, she had two goals: to become a citizen and to serve in the Army. In fulfilling her dream, she made that ultimate sacrifice. Her devotion to her adopted country reflects the fierce loyalty which makes America the greatest nation on earth. Tills Veterans' Day, Americans pay tribute to those extraordinary men and women who in every war have unfailingly answered the call to duty. Their memories will remain part of the fabric of our nation forever. To our veterans and their families: Thank you and GOd bless you. Trim regulations to trim US waistlines By Michael Cannon and Radley Balko The Journal of the American Medi- cal Association recently published a study purporting to link increased soda consump- tion with weight gain. This comes on the heels of studies linking obesity to urban sprawl, longer commutes to work, time in front of the television, time on the Internet, not enough physical education in schools, vending machines in schools, marketing and advertising of junk food to children and countless other trends, foods, habits ' and (in)activities. Unfortunately, a slew of nutrition activists and nanny-statists want to use , the fact that some Americans are getting bigger to limit what all Americans can choose to eat. And so we're seeing lawsuits waged against food companies, calls for "fat taxes" on calorie-dense eatables, and moves for restrictions on the advertising and marketing of junk food. Of course, sensible people oppose such measures and prefer a system where everyone is free to make his or her own decisions about diet and lifestyle but also is required to bear the consequences of those decisions. But there are a number of things we can do that could both facilitate an increased sense of personal responsibility and harness the power of the marketplace to encourage good decisions about diet and activity. For one thing, we could allow health insurance companies to do "medical underwriting" - charging lower insurance premiums for people who exercise regu- larly and follow healthy diets. That only makes sense, as those people are expected to have lower health care costs than donut- munching couch potatoes. Standing in the way of medical underwriting are legal prohibitions against allowing insurers to assign risk in health insurance premiums the same way they do with auto and life insurance premiums. Currently, many states require insurers to charge the same premiums for any member of a group health plan, regardless of risk. Removing those barriers would encour- age insurers to begin experimenting with carrot-and-stick approaches to healthy lifestyles. Congress can help eliminate state laws that encourage unhealthy lifestyles by enacting legislation similar to the Health Care Choice Act, sponsored by Rep. John Shadegg. Shadegg's bill would enable the residents of any state to purchase health insurance in any other state, under the laws and regulations of the state where the insurer is incorporated. A nationwide market for health insur- ance would go a long way toward restrict- ing the obesity problem to the obese, instead of subsidizing it by spreading the costs of weight gain over the entire popula- tion. It certainly won't guarantee an end to the obesity problem, but it would be prefer- able to policies that encourage irresponsi- bility and restrict choice for everyone. Michael Cannon is Director of Health Policy studies, and Radley Balko is a policy analyst with the Cato Institute (www.cato.org). 127rh Year, Series 3, V,>I. XV, N 'q The Clarendon Enterpriae ISSN 1088-9698)is by Roger A. Esttack at 3_05 S, Clarendon. Texas postage paid at Clarendon Copyright 2004. All ri This paper's first duty is that is fit to print, honestly unbiased by any considerati editorial opinion. Any erroneous reflection upon it standing, or reputation of corporation which may occur i of The Clarendon rected upon being the management. Publisher & Editor I Web Master [ Copy Editor [ Helelll Distribution I CORRESPOP Clarendon I Hed/ey lPegi Howardwick Peg ( Clarendon Sports SandY Hedley Sports Outdoor Sports Gary LoCe's Lessons cardet On The Mark chrlldJl E-Mail ADVERT Open Display rates are $4 inch. Classified Ads words and 12 per word for word (Boxes or special Thank You Notes are and 12 per word for each Engagement, wedding, announcements are $1.0 mired for. publication within News articles end plcturel office by Monday at noon. be submitted by five o'clock Deadlines ma) issues. SUBSCRI[ Annual subscriptions are for zip codes inside DonleY of county, and $40 in Send all address changes to: Enterprise, PO Box 1110, 79226-1110. Letters to the editor are alway sl expressed in letters are those t do not necessarily reflect the or staff of The Clarendon sion of a letter does not of that letter. Letters may be mar, style, or length. All letters and must ini clude an address number for verification your chances for space your letter, stick to o fie keep it brief. No letters will 1 candidates for local submitted to this newspaper e The Texas panl00e00 First T, Ct:Nt)N Nl:w5 wRh which have merged: February 1889; The Clarend0a 1891; The neer-Stockr, Agitate, February 1899; May 1908; The Bonle Clarendon Enterprise, March 1 Texas Panhandle TEXAS ASSOCI, AWARD You are reading Winner* by the Texas Better secutwe years. 2 ii!  :' !" + -:++ " i+ E ''  + %    :% S  The Clarendon Enterprise November 4, 2004 WARNING: The following column is an editorial (i.e, an opinion, a point of view) and may contain ideas with which some readers may freely disagree. It could be harmful to liberals, socialists, and other small mammals. Read at your own risk. City Hall vital to downtown revitalization As noted by this week's page-one story, the Clarendon City Hall is in bad shape. Poor maintenance is allowing water to leak inside the building, causing damage that may be expensive to repair. The story sounds depress- ....... ingly familiar. Just a few years ago, the Donley County Court- house was in such a sad state that it took a state grant and just shy of a million dollars in local tax money to bring it back up to standard, editor's City Hall doesn't appear to be in as bad a shape as the court- commentary house then was - at least I don't by roger estlack know of any bat infestation, but city leaders need to act now to keep further damage from being done and ultimately to save the building for future generations. The municipal building was constructed in 1918 with substantial financial assistance by local philanthropist and JA Ranch owner Cornelia Adair, who eight years earlier had built the Adair Hospital. Originally built as a YMCA, City Hall has undergone numerous renovations as needs changed, all the while serving the people of Clarendon in various ways. But for quite some time, the municipal building has been slowly becoming a downtown eyesore. While it retains a certain stately look with its ionic columns and wide front steps, peeling paint and boarded up windows make it look nearly abandoned at first glance. Unlike the pre-restored courthouse, the condition of city offices inside is quite different from the build- ing's outward appearance. Relatively new carpet, fur- niture, and paint give the first floor interior a definitely modem, well-maintained look of which our citizens can be proud. City officials are on the right track as they are currently identifying the problems facing the building and trying to determine what it will take to fix them. Collecting that information will be critical to making a wise, financially sound decision regarding the build- ing's future. As a regular observer of city meetings, I can attest that cit officials have on a few occasions kicked around  id 'Jng the seat of city government to a new location. That ide may have its gTmd points, but Aldermen should resist any urges to abandon the 1918 structure. City Hall has been a local landmark for many years, and it is an important element that helps make up our central business district. Additionally, the municipal building provides valuable workspace, rec- reation areas, and training rooms for the Clarendon Volunteer Fire Department. Moving the city offices would not be a quick fix for the problem since the fire department would still need the building. More importantly, abandoning the current City Hall would instantly create another large, unused or under-used building downtown. City leaders constantly urge Clarendon citizens to fix up and clean up around town. It is incumbent upon them to now put their money where their mouths are. What action the Board of Aldermen ultimately takes regarding City Hall will say a lot about our elected leaders' commitment to improving our community, to revitalizing our downtown, and to being good caretak- ers of our city's assets. We're not looking for a project on the same scale as the courthouse restoration, but fixing up City Hall - making it weather tight and attractive - must be a priority for anyone who hopes to see Clarendon move forward toward a better tomorrow. HoIefully, that statement is something all citizens can agree with as the aldermen begin to look at their options. Meanwhile... Last week's sports headline, "Visiting Indians stomp Broncos at home, 46-19," was entirely accurate, but it seems some folks would have preferred it to read "Broncos edged out by Quanah" or better yet "Bron- cos look forward to next week." Give me a break. The complaints remind me of a couple of years ago when the state-ranked Hedley girls hosted the Clarendon girls in Owl Gym and gave the visitors a basketball lesson. The headline said, "Lady Owls trounce Lady Broncos, 86-44." A 42-point loss sounds like a trouncing to me, bvt some Clarendon parents were upset. I guess we hurt their babies' self esteem - or maybe it was really just the parents' self esteem. The bottom line is this: If Clarendon kids can't handle a truthful headline about a sports game, then they're in for a lot of bigger disappointments in life. Besides, it'll all even out when the o1' Broncos "stomp" or "trounce" somebody else.., just like last Friday night. This paper has always supported the Broncos, but there is no need to sugar-coat the facts for them. I believe our student athletes are a resilient bunch who aren't substantially deterred by headlines.., no matter how they are worded. And finally, if any reader has any trouble about a headline, don't go complaining to the sports writers. They don't write the headlines; I do. Their jobs are hard enough without somebody nitpicking the head- line that gets put on the stories. Power of print produces hairless legs Happy November! By the time this goes m print we will have elected or re- elected a President of the United States of America. I guess I missed my window of opportunity to make fun of the candidates. Now that window is closed, and anything I said would be both rude and irrelevant, November is more than just a month for election days and Thanksgiving and Veterans Day. November on the fourth floor of Blanche Lange Hall is very spe- cial. It's No-Shave November. The rules are very simple. All con- testants will stop shaving their legs on Wednesday, November 3, 2004, at 10 p.m. following a brief informational meeting and sign-up time. Contestants will refrain from shaving until Friday, December 3, 2004, at 10 p.m., when we meet again to declare a winner. The girl who goes the longest without shaving and/or is the most disgusting will win a cash prize and the world's coolest razor. I got the idea from my boss, the dorm director. She was in high school in the 60s, and she and her girlfriends decided that they would hold No-Shave November as a protest. They didn't get too many other girls to sign on, but it was a real bonding experience between them. The girls of the fourth floor are not protesting anything. This is not a political movement. We are not making a state- life's lessons by carrie helms ment. I just want to see that kind of bond- ing between my residents. What is the one thing that unites all American women? We all hate shaving our legs, but we do it on an almost daily basis. America is one of the only nations in the world that requires its women tobe hair- less in order to be sexy. The custom of removing hair from one's legs dates back to the 400s B.C. when Greek women were singeing the hair from their legs with lamps. The custom died out for inexplicable reasons. It was only in May of 1915 that the custom was revived on this continent. It all began with that month's edition of Harper's Bazaar. The magazine featured a model sporting a sleeveless evening gown that exposed, for the first time in fashion, her bare shoulders and her armpits. A young marketing executive with the Wilkinson Sword Company that made razor blades for men, designed a campaign to convince the women of North America that underarm hair was unhygienic and anti-feminine. And it worked! In two years, the sales of razor blades doubled, and almost one hundred years later, women still shave their legs and underarms. That's the power of the print media! If I started a campaign to convince the world that alarm clocks caused brain damage by waking you so rapidly from REM sleep, I could single-handedly bring down the alarm clock industry and have the 8 a.m. class tradition destroyed. Maybe No-Shave November is a movement after all. It is not a call for women to shake off patriarchal oppression, but a call for more responsible advertising and journalism. With great power, comes great respon- sibility. As a journalist I must use my powers for good, not evil. Please join us in No-Shave November, and together we can take over the world for truth, honesty, and an alarm-clock free existence. Veterans Day a time tol;ecall sacrifices From the brave last stand at the Alamo in 1836, to rugged Monte Casino during World War II, to the desert sands of lraq, Texans have earned a reputation for not backing down in the fight for freedom even when it may cost them their lives. It is to honor these brave soldiers that we celebrate Veterans' Day and take time to remember so much given on our behalf. Texas has our nation's third-largest veteran community, according to the 2000 census. Over 1.7 million of our 26.5 mil- lion veterans live in the Lone Star state. Texas is also home to a large number of defense facilities, with over 114,000 military personnel stationed in our bases. Texans serve around the globe, on land, sea, and air, defending this nation and all who value freedom. As we pay our respects this Veterans' Day, I hope we will also pause to show them our gratitude as well. I try to express my thanks to our vet- erans by doing my part in Congress, where I serve on the Veterans Affairs Committee. There I have worked with my colleagues to ensure we provide our veterans the best possible resources and care. In recent years, we've passed a range of legislation that addressed the needs of our veteran community: the Veterans' Opportunities Act, which created new life insurance and health care benefits for up to two million eligible spouses and chil- dren of veterans; the Homeless Veterans Comprehensive Assistance Act that authorized $1 bil- !!i capitol comment by sen. kay bailey hutchison lion to aid homeless veterans and prevent others from becoming homeless; and the Veterans Education and Benefits Expansion Act, which authorized more than $3.1 bil- lion over five years to expand educational, housing, burial, and disability benefits. Earlier we introduced legislation to assist Medicare-eligible veterans struggling with the costs of prescription medications. And we have continued to pass strong Defense and Military Construction appro- priations bills to ensure our troops are fully equipped to face the enemy. Fighting in distant lands can be lonely and trying for troops who miss home. Yet every day we see more evidence of a "can do" spirit and Texas ingenuity to help bridge the gap between our troops and their loved ones. If anyone wants to talk about family values, they should look at our men and women in uniform. And speaking of values, it is good to know that the courage that burned in the soldiers of the Alamo still shines brightly. Sgt. Pamela Osboume used to call her husband Rohan almost every day from her supply depot in Baghdad. Her last conversation with her husband is poignant. "Hold your head up, baby," she said. "I'm coming home. Even if I come home in a box, you should know that I did it for you. Take care of the kids. Stay strong. And remember that I love you." Unfortunately, she and a fellow soldier were killed the next day. Sgt. Osbourne joined the ranks of those veterans who have died so we may remain free. An immigrant who came to our country at age 14, she had two goals: to become a citizen and to serve in the Army. In fulfilling her dream, she made that ultimate sacrifice. Her devotion to her adopted country reflects the fierce loyalty which makes America the greatest nation on earth. Tills Veterans' Day, Americans pay tribute to those extraordinary men and women who in every war have unfailingly answered the call to duty. Their memories will remain part of the fabric of our nation forever. To our veterans and their families: Thank you and GOd bless you. Trim regulations to trim US waistlines By Michael Cannon and Radley Balko The Journal of the American Medi- cal Association recently published a study purporting to link increased soda consump- tion with weight gain. This comes on the heels of studies linking obesity to urban sprawl, longer commutes to work, time in front of the television, time on the Internet, not enough physical education in schools, vending machines in schools, marketing and advertising of junk food to children and countless other trends, foods, habits ' and (in)activities. Unfortunately, a slew of nutrition activists and nanny-statists want to use , the fact that some Americans are getting bigger to limit what all Americans can choose to eat. And so we're seeing lawsuits waged against food companies, calls for "fat taxes" on calorie-dense eatables, and moves for restrictions on the advertising and marketing of junk food. Of course, sensible people oppose such measures and prefer a system where everyone is free to make his or her own decisions about diet and lifestyle but also is required to bear the consequences of those decisions. But there are a number of things we can do that could both facilitate an increased sense of personal responsibility and harness the power of the marketplace to encourage good decisions about diet and activity. For one thing, we could allow health insurance companies to do "medical underwriting" - charging lower insurance premiums for people who exercise regu- larly and follow healthy diets. That only makes sense, as those people are expected to have lower health care costs than donut- munching couch potatoes. Standing in the way of medical underwriting are legal prohibitions against allowing insurers to assign risk in health insurance premiums the same way they do with auto and life insurance premiums. Currently, many states require insurers to charge the same premiums for any member of a group health plan, regardless of risk. Removing those barriers would encour- age insurers to begin experimenting with carrot-and-stick approaches to healthy lifestyles. Congress can help eliminate state laws that encourage unhealthy lifestyles by enacting legislation similar to the Health Care Choice Act, sponsored by Rep. John Shadegg. Shadegg's bill would enable the residents of any state to purchase health insurance in any other state, under the laws and regulations of the state where the insurer is incorporated. A nationwide market for health insur- ance would go a long way toward restrict- ing the obesity problem to the obese, instead of subsidizing it by spreading the costs of weight gain over the entire popula- tion. It certainly won't guarantee an end to the obesity problem, but it would be prefer- able to policies that encourage irresponsi- bility and restrict choice for everyone. Michael Cannon is Director of Health Policy studies, and Radley Balko is a policy analyst with the Cato Institute (www.cato.org). 127rh Year, Series 3, V,>I. XV, N 'q The Clarendon Enterpriae ISSN 1088-9698)is by Roger A. Esttack at 3_05 S, Clarendon. Texas postage paid at Clarendon Copyright 2004. All ri This paper's first duty is that is fit to print, honestly unbiased by any considerati editorial opinion. Any erroneous reflection upon it standing, or reputation of corporation which may occur i of The Clarendon rected upon being the management. Publisher & Editor I Web Master [ Copy Editor [ Helelll Distribution I CORRESPOP Clarendon I Hed/ey lPegi Howardwick Peg ( Clarendon Sports SandY Hedley Sports Outdoor Sports Gary LoCe's Lessons cardet On The Mark chrlldJl E-Mail ADVERT Open Display rates are $4 inch. Classified Ads words and 12 per word for word (Boxes or special Thank You Notes are and 12 per word for each Engagement, wedding, announcements are $1.0 mired for. publication within News articles end plcturel office by Monday at noon. be submitted by five o'clock Deadlines ma) issues. SUBSCRI[ Annual subscriptions are for zip codes inside DonleY of county, and $40 in Send all address changes to: Enterprise, PO Box 1110, 79226-1110. Letters to the editor are alway sl expressed in letters are those t do not necessarily reflect the or staff of The Clarendon sion of a letter does not of that letter. Letters may be mar, style, or length. All letters and must ini clude an address number for verification your chances for space your letter, stick to o fie keep it brief. No letters will 1 candidates for local submitted to this newspaper e The Texas panl00e00 First T, Ct:Nt)N Nl:w5 wRh which have merged: February 1889; The Clarend0a 1891; The neer-Stockr, Agitate, February 1899; May 1908; The Bonle Clarendon Enterprise, March 1 Texas Panhandle TEXAS ASSOCI, AWARD You are reading Winner* by the Texas Better secutwe years.