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November 4, 2004     The Clarendon Enterprise
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November 4, 2004
 

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COUNTRY TRADER EVERY PAGE HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE! NOVEMBER 4, 2004 PAGE 3 season (AP) flu-shot makes it for r Americans to Second, often vaccine against of pneumonia that's a m o n of Called naococcal it's a one- for anyone Younger with heart diseases, or weak systems not a for a flu high-risk should trying to of the same most to flu also risk from dangerous infection. need the ococcal anyway. says Poland Mayo Clinic, advises the on iraococcal "It's a good to prevent of We certainly lope so. Because that's exact what we offer! d its name, protects more than shots particularly critical additional strains of the germ and thus need the adult version of the vaccine, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: --Everyone 65 and older. --Anyone with diabetes, heart disease, chronic lung disease except asthma, chronic liver disease or kidney failure. --Anyone with weakened immune systems from cancer, HIV or organ transplants. --People without a functioning spleen or who have sickle cell disease. --Residents of long- term care facilities. Every fall, the CDC issues a call for those people to get the vaccine, called Pneumovax -- a call this year overshadowed by the flu-shot crisis. The government hopes to have 90 percent of the elderly vaccinated against pneumococcal disease by 2010, but just 63 percent are now. Even fewer of the younger high-risk patients are thought to be protected. "Both the public and unfortunately health care workers are inadequately pneumonia. It prevents deadly blood infections and meningitis, too, caused by a bacterium called pneumococcus. It's a scary germ, because it causes so much damage so rapidly. Poland describes a seemingly healthy grandmother who one day felt a little achy and feverish. The next day, she was rushed to the hospital. The germs had infected the w o m a n s bloodstream. "To save her, they would have to cut away parts of her," Poland recalls. Her hands and feet amputated, she now uses a wheelchair. Federal data show that each year, 175,000 Americans are hospitalized with pneumococcal- caused pneumonia. In addition, the germ causes more than 50,000 blood infections and up to 6,000 cases of meningitis. Almost 6,000 die. A childhood vaccine, called Prevnar, has proved very effective at battling seven pneumococcal strains common in babies and toddlers. Millions of adults are at high risk from informed," Poland laments. "They simply do not know this vaccine is available." Medicare pays for the shot; for younger patients, cost ranges from $30 to $50. The good news: There's no shortage of Pneumovax, Poland says, although there is only one supplier, Merck & Co. While one shot lasts the elderly a lifetime, anyone under 65 when they get the adult vaccination needs a booster after five years. Stay tuned: Health officials are considering expanding the number of people who should get vaccinated to anyone 50 or older. That's the age when the risk of i n v a s i v e pneumococcal disease begins to rise, before a more dramatic surge in the 60s, explains Poland, who is heading a CDC panel debating the change. For now, if today's toll isn't convincing enough, consider that the germs are rapidly evolving ways to defy antibiotic treatment. "Ignorance isn't bliss," Poland warns. "Sometimes it kills you." lyzed Texan walks again help of robot each swish of device to his legs, Benefield after step, easily as he an hour on good to be going," said who was in a accident Dallas. "wonderful for cardiovascular function, wonderful in helping to prevent pressure sores, ' and helps build a person's confidence. "We at the foundation are certainly very interested in moving this therapy out into wide clinical practices," Howley said. Dr. Keith Tansey, who coordinates Southwestern's clinical program for spinal-cord injury, said more research is needed before the Lokomat becomes more widely availability. Developed by the Swiss company Hocoma AG, the first Lokomat came to the United States in 2001. About 14 Lokomats, which cost about $250,000 each, are now available in the Benefield is among 247,000 people nationwide who live with paralysis following a traumatic spinal cord injury, according to the National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center. Spinal injuries and treatments for them were highlighted last week following the death of "Superman" star Christopher Reeve, who became an advocate for spinal cord research after he was paralyzed in a horse- riding accident in 1995. Susan Howley, director of research for the New Jersey- based Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation, said the Lokomat is a harness his over the Benefield's hips are into a exoskeleton, as the which a walking as he in front of a at the of Texas western Center in United States. Benefield, 50, began using the Lokomat earlier this year as part of a 90- day study of patients with partial damage of the spinal cord. He still uses the device three days a week as part of his therapy. Benetield, who was thrown from his motorcycle after being rear-ended on a country road just outside Dallas, now gets around in an electric wheelchair, which he can maneuver with his hands. Family, friends and a caretaker drive him where he needs to go. "I knew it was going to be a tough road," said Benefield, who could only move one big toe after the accident. "My goal is to be as self-sufficient as I can be." The Lokomat may Business Opportunity, Weekly newspaper for sale near Lubbock. Bldg. & land. 298-2033 or 298-2909. hour hoUlne to homebuyer or EZ Of 3 All put you , We qualify ev- bad, or no r16wlde3+2, Juet THE ABERNATIIY WEEIG Y ,,..o,. REVIEW flnance, $.75 w.,.c. CALL ltO0 4+2. Just ,,, 298-2033 TO PLACEYOU AD IN NEXT WEEK'S IT BY 140 YEARS OF AND STABILITY? IT BY THE NUMBER OF LOCATIONS? IT BY THE CONVENIENCE OF THOSE LOCATIONS? IT BY THE EXTRAORDINARY FACILITIES AND SERVICES THEY OFFER? IT BY THE DEDICATED STAFF? Is IT BY THE AMOUNT oF PARKING? Is IT THE FACT THAT YOU PROBABLY HAW YOUR PRE-ARRANGEMENTS WITH THEM? LEMONS Funeral Home and WOOD-DUNNING Funeral Home have spent decades earning the trust of this community. When the time comes for you to select a funeral home we hope we have made the choice an easy one. For more information call us today! LEMONS Funeral Home 206 West 8th Plainview TX - 79072 806-296-5566 WOOD-DUNNING Funeral Home 2715 Ohon Road Plainview TX - 79072 806-296-2721 help him do that. In May, about a year after his accident, Benefield walked across a room with the help of three therapists and a walker. The process was slow and he needed a lot of help, but he started to move his legs on his own. Benefield still needs the help of therapists and a walker, but he now moves his legs on his own most of the time. He says working on the Lokomat has helped reduce the swelling in his legs and improve his endurance. He's regained muscle tone and feeling in his legs. His fingers, tightly curled before he started his workout, become more loose after an hour on the machine, Benefield said. "The best part is not necessarily watching his body," physical therapist Nathan Foreman said. "It's watching the smile on his face." Tansey said research has shown that animals with cut spinal cords will learn to take steps if placed over a treadmill. "The circuitry in the spinal cord alone is enough for it to learn stepping," Tansey said. The thought is that the same thing can happen in humans, he said. Brain scans also have shown more activity in certain areas of the brain after spinal cord patients do such training, Tansey said. Southwestern is beginning to study a various aspects of the Lokomat, including the difference between working out on the machine and training on a treadmill with a physical therapist, Tansey said. One advantage of the Lokomat is that it eliminates the need for several therapists to assist patients. During conventional treatments, physical therapists manually move a patient's hips and legs, which is tiring to both the patient and the therapists. While the Lokomat isn't a cure for paralysis, some patients with partial spinal cord injuries can walk "household distances" after working on the Lokomat, Tansey said. Patients with complete spinal cord injuries show some minor benefits, like more muscle activity, he said. "When they put me on the Lokomat, in the first two to three weeks I was amazed at the difference," said Benefield, who previously did manual training. "I look the first steps with my left leg after a month." Benefield said the Lokomat has given him the hope of a faster recovery. "All they would tell my family was doom and gloom -- I wouldn't be able to walk again," he said. "I never listened to them. I may not be able to walk without the assistance of a walker, but I know I'll be able to get around. It's a matter of when." e Holi Purchase of Carpet & Padding COUNTRY TRADER EVERY PAGE HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE! NOVEMBER 4, 2004 PAGE 3 season (AP) flu-shot makes it for r Americans to Second, often vaccine against of pneumonia that's a m o n of Called naococcal it's a one- for anyone Younger with heart diseases, or weak systems not a for a flu high-risk should trying to of the same most to flu also risk from dangerous infection. need the ococcal anyway. says Poland Mayo Clinic, advises the on iraococcal "It's a good to prevent of We certainly lope so. Because that's exact what we offer! d its name, protects more than shots particularly critical additional strains of the germ and thus need the adult version of the vaccine, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: --Everyone 65 and older. --Anyone with diabetes, heart disease, chronic lung disease except asthma, chronic liver disease or kidney failure. --Anyone with weakened immune systems from cancer, HIV or organ transplants. --People without a functioning spleen or who have sickle cell disease. --Residents of long- term care facilities. Every fall, the CDC issues a call for those people to get the vaccine, called Pneumovax -- a call this year overshadowed by the flu-shot crisis. The government hopes to have 90 percent of the elderly vaccinated against pneumococcal disease by 2010, but just 63 percent are now. Even fewer of the younger high-risk patients are thought to be protected. "Both the public and unfortunately health care workers are inadequately pneumonia. It prevents deadly blood infections and meningitis, too, caused by a bacterium called pneumococcus. It's a scary germ, because it causes so much damage so rapidly. Poland describes a seemingly healthy grandmother who one day felt a little achy and feverish. The next day, she was rushed to the hospital. The germs had infected the w o m a n s bloodstream. "To save her, they would have to cut away parts of her," Poland recalls. Her hands and feet amputated, she now uses a wheelchair. Federal data show that each year, 175,000 Americans are hospitalized with pneumococcal- caused pneumonia. In addition, the germ causes more than 50,000 blood infections and up to 6,000 cases of meningitis. Almost 6,000 die. A childhood vaccine, called Prevnar, has proved very effective at battling seven pneumococcal strains common in babies and toddlers. Millions of adults are at high risk from informed," Poland laments. "They simply do not know this vaccine is available." Medicare pays for the shot; for younger patients, cost ranges from $30 to $50. The good news: There's no shortage of Pneumovax, Poland says, although there is only one supplier, Merck & Co. While one shot lasts the elderly a lifetime, anyone under 65 when they get the adult vaccination needs a booster after five years. Stay tuned: Health officials are considering expanding the number of people who should get vaccinated to anyone 50 or older. That's the age when the risk of i n v a s i v e pneumococcal disease begins to rise, before a more dramatic surge in the 60s, explains Poland, who is heading a CDC panel debating the change. For now, if today's toll isn't convincing enough, consider that the germs are rapidly evolving ways to defy antibiotic treatment. "Ignorance isn't bliss," Poland warns. "Sometimes it kills you." lyzed Texan walks again help of robot each swish of device to his legs, Benefield after step, easily as he an hour on good to be going," said who was in a accident Dallas. "wonderful for cardiovascular function, wonderful in helping to prevent pressure sores, ' and helps build a person's confidence. "We at the foundation are certainly very interested in moving this therapy out into wide clinical practices," Howley said. Dr. Keith Tansey, who coordinates Southwestern's clinical program for spinal-cord injury, said more research is needed before the Lokomat becomes more widely availability. Developed by the Swiss company Hocoma AG, the first Lokomat came to the United States in 2001. About 14 Lokomats, which cost about $250,000 each, are now available in the Benefield is among 247,000 people nationwide who live with paralysis following a traumatic spinal cord injury, according to the National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center. Spinal injuries and treatments for them were highlighted last week following the death of "Superman" star Christopher Reeve, who became an advocate for spinal cord research after he was paralyzed in a horse- riding accident in 1995. Susan Howley, director of research for the New Jersey- based Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation, said the Lokomat is a harness his over the Benefield's hips are into a exoskeleton, as the which a walking as he in front of a at the of Texas western Center in United States. Benefield, 50, began using the Lokomat earlier this year as part of a 90- day study of patients with partial damage of the spinal cord. He still uses the device three days a week as part of his therapy. Benetield, who was thrown from his motorcycle after being rear-ended on a country road just outside Dallas, now gets around in an electric wheelchair, which he can maneuver with his hands. Family, friends and a caretaker drive him where he needs to go. "I knew it was going to be a tough road," said Benefield, who could only move one big toe after the accident. "My goal is to be as self-sufficient as I can be." The Lokomat may Business Opportunity, Weekly newspaper for sale near Lubbock. Bldg. & land. 298-2033 or 298-2909. hour hoUlne to homebuyer or EZ Of 3 All put you , We qualify ev- bad, or no r16wlde3+2, Juet THE ABERNATIIY WEEIG Y ,,..o,. REVIEW flnance, $.75 w.,.c. CALL ltO0 4+2. Just ,,, 298-2033 TO PLACEYOU AD IN NEXT WEEK'S IT BY 140 YEARS OF AND STABILITY? IT BY THE NUMBER OF LOCATIONS? IT BY THE CONVENIENCE OF THOSE LOCATIONS? IT BY THE EXTRAORDINARY FACILITIES AND SERVICES THEY OFFER? IT BY THE DEDICATED STAFF? Is IT BY THE AMOUNT oF PARKING? Is IT THE FACT THAT YOU PROBABLY HAW YOUR PRE-ARRANGEMENTS WITH THEM? LEMONS Funeral Home and WOOD-DUNNING Funeral Home have spent decades earning the trust of this community. When the time comes for you to select a funeral home we hope we have made the choice an easy one. For more information call us today! LEMONS Funeral Home 206 West 8th Plainview TX - 79072 806-296-5566 WOOD-DUNNING Funeral Home 2715 Ohon Road Plainview TX - 79072 806-296-2721 help him do that. In May, about a year after his accident, Benefield walked across a room with the help of three therapists and a walker. The process was slow and he needed a lot of help, but he started to move his legs on his own. Benefield still needs the help of therapists and a walker, but he now moves his legs on his own most of the time. He says working on the Lokomat has helped reduce the swelling in his legs and improve his endurance. He's regained muscle tone and feeling in his legs. His fingers, tightly curled before he started his workout, become more loose after an hour on the machine, Benefield said. "The best part is not necessarily watching his body," physical therapist Nathan Foreman said. "It's watching the smile on his face." Tansey said research has shown that animals with cut spinal cords will learn to take steps if placed over a treadmill. "The circuitry in the spinal cord alone is enough for it to learn stepping," Tansey said. The thought is that the same thing can happen in humans, he said. Brain scans also have shown more activity in certain areas of the brain after spinal cord patients do such training, Tansey said. Southwestern is beginning to study a various aspects of the Lokomat, including the difference between working out on the machine and training on a treadmill with a physical therapist, Tansey said. One advantage of the Lokomat is that it eliminates the need for several therapists to assist patients. During conventional treatments, physical therapists manually move a patient's hips and legs, which is tiring to both the patient and the therapists. While the Lokomat isn't a cure for paralysis, some patients with partial spinal cord injuries can walk "household distances" after working on the Lokomat, Tansey said. Patients with complete spinal cord injuries show some minor benefits, like more muscle activity, he said. "When they put me on the Lokomat, in the first two to three weeks I was amazed at the difference," said Benefield, who previously did manual training. "I look the first steps with my left leg after a month." Benefield said the Lokomat has given him the hope of a faster recovery. "All they would tell my family was doom and gloom -- I wouldn't be able to walk again," he said. "I never listened to them. I may not be able to walk without the assistance of a walker, but I know I'll be able to get around. It's a matter of when." e Holi Purchase of Carpet & Padding